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Research and Theatre: A Life’s Devotion

Posted by Jessica Gaines
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Research and Theatre: A Life’s Devotion

When Merrill Shugoll was selling candy at the Kennedy Center in her youth, would she have thought that she would become a research leader for arts organizations? As President of Shugoll Research in Bethesda, MD, Merrill and her team provide market research services to corporate and nonprofit clients including theatre companies, all over the country. In this interview from Broadwayworld.com, hear from the company’s CEO Mark Shugoll and President Merrill Shugoll – a husband and wife duo with a mutual love for research, theatre, and arts.

 

In the interview, Mark and Merrill talk about the importance of business and community leaders joining Boards of arts and theatre organizations.  They also share how their business came to adopt the arts as its corporate and philanthropic cause, and came to identify the arts sector as having the same [research] needs as the private sector.

 

Merrill also shares how theatre can open up one’s mind to other groups of people and that just one show, South Pacific, helped expose her to prejudice.

 

 

 

Not only is Shugoll Research a recipient of BCA 10 award but Mark Shugoll is also a lively and proud member of Americans for the Arts BCA Executive Board.

 

In January 2017, Shugoll Research was named by Chief Executive magazine a winner of its First Annual (2017) Corporate Citizenship Award for Culture and Arts. Shugoll Research was honored for its commitment to supporting arts organizations and helping to build future audiences for the arts among young people with its 20-year old initiative ArtSpeak!, which brings theater artists into public schools. These artists excite and educate young people about the arts by performing, participating in talk-backs, and talking about their careers. Coverage of the awards will appear in the March/April issue of Chief Executive magazine.

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Culture is a Growing Trend for International Businesses

Posted by Kate Reese
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Culture is a Growing Trend for International Businesses

As data is increasingly used to modify indicators and improve performance in the business sector, it has become more apparent that strong organizational cultural is an important factor in growth. Deloitte’s recently published Global Human Capital Trends 2016 study, which is based on more than 7,000 survey responses, shows evidence to support this claim.

 

The report states that:

 

  1. Culture is a business issue, not merely an HR issue. The CEO and executive team should take responsibility for an organization’s culture, with HR supporting that responsibility through measurement, process, and infrastructure.
  2. While culture is widely viewed as important, it is still largely not well understood; many organizations find it difficult to measure and even more difficult to manage. Only 28 percent of survey respondents believe they understand their culture well, while only 19 percent believe they have the “right culture.”

 

Though the survey responses were sourced from more than 130 countries, nearly 82% of respondents agree that culture is a competitive advantage. However, only 28% of respondents are familiar with the cultural values of their company.

Is there a solution to the problem? It might be closer than you think: the arts.Engaging business employees through volunteerism and the arts is key to fostering a desirable work environment, increasing efficiency and morale, and doing good in the community as well as in the company. You can bridge the employee engagement gap by using the arts as a vehicle for driving positive change in a company’s culture. Here are 10 ways the arts can boost employee engagement in various facets of your company.

 

Across the country, today’s most innovative businesses are using the arts to help them meet some of their most difficult and vital objectives. Learn from these examples in Americans for the Arts’ essays that profile successful arts and business partnerships from across the nation, including one that focuses on using arts partnerships to inspire and engage employeesso that they are able to achieve their full potential.

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Why should your business support the arts? Because your employees support the arts!

Posted by Stacy Lasner
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Americans for the Arts has released an in-depth study of American perceptions and attitudes towards the arts, which reveals that working Americans support arts education and favor government funding for the arts. 48 percent of the survey respondents were employed full time when taking the survey.

 

The survey, conducted by Ipsos Public Affairs in December 2015, polled 3,020 adults online on topics such as support for arts education and government arts funding, personal engagement in the arts, the personal benefits and well-being that comes from engaging in the arts, and if/how those benefits extend more broadly to the community. The study is being released in phases with another section coming in spring 2016.

 

Key findings include: 

 

 

  • The survey demonstrates that the public wants more government funding for the arts, and they are more likely to favor than to penalize candidates at the ballot box for providing it. A blog discussing these findings in detail is available on Americans for the Arts’ website.

 

  • Americans are especially likely to favor funding programs that beautify blighted or abandoned areas, create programs for the elderly, and promote pro-social behavior with at-risk youth (68 percent each); aid returning military personnel (69 percent) and provide art in public spaces (71 percent). Funding for programs seeking to create religious art in public spaces is seen as least favorable, though still supported 41 percent. Learn about Americans for the Arts' Public Art Network and our work with arts and health in the military.

 

  • One in five would be willing to pay more taxes (17 percent) in order to see arts funding increase, while similar proportions think the government should cut from other areas of the budget in order to fund the arts more (18 percent). Another 19 percent would like to pay less taxes, but still cut from other areas of the budget to maintain arts funding.

 

Learn more about this study and find other relevant research.

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Connecting Art and Business in Practice

Posted by Mica Scalin
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Mica Scalin is the Co-Founder of Another Limited Rebellion, which helps businesses and individuals devleop their own creative practices to grow and succeed. She has worked in communications, marketing, and creative development for Showtime Networks, CBS, and NBC Universal. She was the Head of Communications for the nonprofit JDub and has produced and curated numerous art and cultural exhibitions and events.

 

The following is excerpted from Scalin's ARTSblog post on AmericansfortheArts.org.

 

Another Limited Rebellion,

Times Are Changing

Dozens of times in the past few years I’ve been in a room of professionals in non-arts related fields (think engineering, manufacturing, energy, finance) and asked the question: “Do you need creativity to succeed at your job?” In this time, I’ve seen the show of hands go from less-than-half the group to 99% of the room. Not only are they aware they need it, they are quick to articulate why; innovation and differentiation, marketing and customer engagement, recruitment and culture building. BUT when I ask a follow up question to the same people: “Would you call yourself creative?” only 2-3 hands are raised and tentatively at that. This is the discrepancy we think is essential to address.

 

Window of Opportunity

I loved the story that was told in Americans for the Arts’ 2013 BCA Survey of Business Support for the Arts. It absolutely validated what we had been seeing with our clients and helped us to hone in on how best to offer something they could really use.

 

Only a small percentage of the responders said they supported the arts because it helped their businesses grow or meet corporate objectives. On the other hand, a great majority said they would increase contributions to the arts if it increased their businesses profitability.

 

Now, while it is very unlikely that we could actually get the data to prove our art engagements affect bottom lines, there is another angle to come at this same issue because 59% said they would increase contributions if it was demonstrated that the arts promote employee creativity and growth. Any business that invests in employee growth and creativity does it because they believe it will increase profitability and impact their bottom line.

 

We know that arts can promote creativity and growth in individuals in so many ways but the challenge is how to do this in a way that reflects a businesses needs.

 

Sharing Practice

Turn over my business card and you will see the words “Creativity Is A Practice”. I love seeing the “ah-ha moment” on people’s faces when they read those words. It is like a muscle that gets exercised, those who practice it, have more of its power available to them. Most importantly, it is a way of thinking about creativity that makes its value available to anyone.

 

When we share our practice we make ourselves vulnerable by exposing the not-quite-right, the trials and errors and the outright failures. This in itself is helpful because it demonstrates that creating something great requires a lot of messiness and uncertainty in the process. Becoming comfortable with such ambiguities and developing a kind of resilience is how artists survive and grow.

 

Seeing how artists must continually put un-finished, in-complete work out for critique in order to improve their work, sets a great example for those in businesses that are struggling to get ahead. In an environment not necessarily conducive to the relentless iterative, trial and error processes that innovation requires, artists can provide a model.
 

Times Are Changing

Dozens of times in the past few years I’ve been in a room of professionals in non-arts related fields (think engineering, manufacturing, energy, finance) and asked the question: “Do you need creativity to succeed at your job?” In this time, I’ve seen the show of hands go from less-than-half the group to 99% of the room. Not only are they aware they need it, they are quick to articulate why; innovation and differentiation, marketing and customer engagement, recruitment and culture building. BUT when I ask a follow up question to the same people: “Would you call yourself creative?” only 2-3 hands are raised and tentatively at that. This is the discrepancy we think is essential to address. If people feel so alienated from their own creativity how can truely value and appreciate the labor of artists?

Window of Opportunity

I loved the story that was told in Americans for the Arts’ 2013 BCA Survey of Business Support for the Arts. It absolutely validated what we had been seeing with our clients and helped us to hone in on how best to offer something they could really use.

Only a small percentage of the responders said they supported the arts because it helped their businesses grow or meet corporate objectives. On the other hand, a great majority said they would increase contributions to the arts if it increased their businesses profitability.

Now, while it is very unlikely that we could actually get the data to prove our art engagements affect bottom lines, there is another angle to come at this same issue because 59% said they would increase contributions if it was demonstrated that the arts promote employee creativity and growth. Any business that invests in employee growth and creativity does it because they believe it will increase profitability and impact their bottom line.

We know that arts can promote creativity and growth in individuals in so many ways but the challenge is how to do this in a way that reflects a businesses needs.

Sharing Practice

Turn over my business card and you will see the words “Creativity Is A Practice”. I love seeing the “ah-ha moment” on people’s faces when they read those words. It is like a muscle that gets exercised, those who practice it, have more of its power available to them. Most importantly, it is a way of thinking about creativity that makes its value available to anyone.

When we share our practice we make ourselves vulnerable by exposing the not-quite-right, the trials and errors and the outright failures. This in itself is helpful because it demonstrates that creating something great requires a lot of messiness and uncertainty in the process. Becoming comfortable with such ambiguities and developing a kind of resilience is how artists survive and grow.

Seeing how artists must continually put un-finished, in-complete work out for critique in order to improve their work, sets a great example for those in businesses that are struggling to get ahead. In an environment not necessarily conducive to the relentless iterative, trial and error processes that innovation requires, artists can provide a model.

- See more at: http://blog.americansforthearts.org/node/95091/draft#sthash.qmwTMRSs.dpuf

Times Are Changing

Dozens of times in the past few years I’ve been in a room of professionals in non-arts related fields (think engineering, manufacturing, energy, finance) and asked the question: “Do you need creativity to succeed at your job?” In this time, I’ve seen the show of hands go from less-than-half the group to 99% of the room. Not only are they aware they need it, they are quick to articulate why; innovation and differentiation, marketing and customer engagement, recruitment and culture building. BUT when I ask a follow up question to the same people: “Would you call yourself creative?” only 2-3 hands are raised and tentatively at that. This is the discrepancy we think is essential to address. If people feel so alienated from their own creativity how can truely value and appreciate the labor of artists?

Window of Opportunity

I loved the story that was told in Americans for the Arts’ 2013 BCA Survey of Business Support for the Arts. It absolutely validated what we had been seeing with our clients and helped us to hone in on how best to offer something they could really use.

Only a small percentage of the responders said they supported the arts because it helped their businesses grow or meet corporate objectives. On the other hand, a great majority said they would increase contributions to the arts if it increased their businesses profitability.

Now, while it is very unlikely that we could actually get the data to prove our art engagements affect bottom lines, there is another angle to come at this same issue because 59% said they would increase contributions if it was demonstrated that the arts promote employee creativity and growth. Any business that invests in employee growth and creativity does it because they believe it will increase profitability and impact their bottom line.

We know that arts can promote creativity and growth in individuals in so many ways but the challenge is how to do this in a way that reflects a businesses needs.

Sharing Practice

Turn over my business card and you will see the words “Creativity Is A Practice”. I love seeing the “ah-ha moment” on people’s faces when they read those words. It is like a muscle that gets exercised, those who practice it, have more of its power available to them. Most importantly, it is a way of thinking about creativity that makes its value available to anyone.

When we share our practice we make ourselves vulnerable by exposing the not-quite-right, the trials and errors and the outright failures. This in itself is helpful because it demonstrates that creating something great requires a lot of messiness and uncertainty in the process. Becoming comfortable with such ambiguities and developing a kind of resilience is how artists survive and grow.

Seeing how artists must continually put un-finished, in-complete work out for critique in order to improve their work, sets a great example for those in businesses that are struggling to get ahead. In an environment not necessarily conducive to the relentless iterative, trial and error processes that innovation requires, artists can provide a model.

- See more at: http://blog.americansforthearts.org/node/95091/draft#sthash.qmwTMRSs.dpuf
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Recruitment & Retention’s Secret Weapon

Posted by Stacy Lasner
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Recruitment & Retention’s Secret Weapon

 

What keeps CEOs up at night? According to new research by The Conference Board, failure to attract and retain talent is at the top of the list, and innovation isn’t far behind. In December 2015, voluntary quits rose to nearly 3.1 million, the highest level since December 2006. For HR practitioners charged with battling these challenges, it’s time to raise the curtain on businesses’ secret weapon: the arts.

 

Build it and they will come.

Des Moines had an image problem. Creative millennials were leaving the city after graduation for more vibrant communities. To solve the problem, the city’s businesses banded together to fund The Des Moines Social Club, which now hosts over 700 events a year, manages four resident theater companies, and helps sustain many arts organizations in the city. The transformation is evident. In 2014, Fortune named Des Moines the #1 City with an Up-and-Coming Downtown and Forbes named Des Moines the #1 Best City for Young Professionals. The robust arts scene has helped creative employees see Des Moines as more than just cornfields.

 

Remember, inspired employees bring creativity to work.

Just as creative employees want live in a vibrant community, they crave a culturally rich work environment. An engaging company culture is a crucial asset for businesses competing for top talent. Facebook, for example, not only offers employees opportunities to take art classes but, like many companies of all sizes, it employs an artist-in-residence to help inspire creativity and present new ways for employees to think about their work. Other businesses like The Standard insurance company host employee art shows to engage employees, empowering them to exercise their creative skills and pursue their artistic passions.

 

Embrace diversity and open-mindedness.

According to a 2015 survey from Human Capital Media Advisory Group, the research arm of Talent Management magazine, "Almost three-quarters of human resources practitioners see diversity and inclusion as a strategic enabler for their companies' business strategy." Celebrating diversity communicates to employees and future employees that your business embraces an open exchange of ideas. Utility company PECO, for example, hosts multicultural events in Philadelphia, not only contributing to the city’s appeal, but also promoting its commitment to diversity in a visible way. Other businesses express their commitment to diversity by displaying corporate art collections in their lobbies.

 

     Take your employee communications cue from “AutoZone the Opera.”

Employee communication is key to retaining talented employees. Regardless of the industry, arts-training not only helps staff communicate better with one another, but artful messaging is more likely to hold employees’ attention. At AutoZone’s 2013 and 2014 national conferences, the company partnered with Opera Memphis to produce “AutoZone: The Opera.” The performances reminded employees about the company’s values and customer service procedures in a fun, memorable way.

 

Supporting the arts is not a new concept for America’s businesses, but in order to solve today's pressing human capital issues, HR practitioners need to tap into their own creativity and put the arts to work.

 

The pARTnership Movement is an initiative from Americans for the Arts to reach business leaders with the message that partnering with the arts can build their competitive advantage. Want to learn more?

 

Find additional ways that the arts can help your business thrive in 2016.

 

Read The pARTnership Movement essay on recruiting and retaining talent.

 

Read success stories showcasing how Americans businesses are using the arts to recruit and retain talent.

 

Find other examples of businesses using the arts to recruit and retain talent.

 

Sign up for our monthly arts and business newletter to receive more relevant research and examples of how the arts can help businesses recruit and retain talent.

 

Is your business using the arts to recruit and retain talent? Tell us about it on Twitter using #ArtsandBiz or email us at pARTnership@artsusa.org.

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NEA Research on The Arts & Economic Growth

Posted by Stacy Lasner
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NEA Research on The Arts & Economic Growth

Photo: National Endowment for the Arts.

 

Let's talk numbers. Not only are the arts a great way to engage employees and put your brand in the spotlight, but by partnering with arts organizations, your business is also helping to sustain a big contributor to the U.S. economy.

 

Arts and culture contributed $704.2 billion to the U.S. economy in 2013 (4.2% of GDP) according to new research from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. This number represents a 32.5% growth in GDP contribution between 1998 and 2013.

 

The Arts and Cultural Production Satellite Account (ACPSA) is the first federal effort to provide in-depth analysis of the arts and cultural sector's contributions to the economy. In addition to the overall contribution numbers, ACPSA reveals that consumer spending on the performing arts grew 10 percent annually over the 15-year period.

 

“The new data shows that the production of performing arts services has grown at a faster clip than arts and cultural production in general, contributing $44.5 billion to the U.S. economy in 2013,” said NEA Chairman Jane Chu. “Notably, the ACPSA reveals that Americans are choosing to spend more on performing arts events such as concerts, plays, and dance performances. This tells us that the arts remain a valuable and desirable commodity for U.S. consumers, and that the arts are a strong contributor to America’s economic vitality.”

 

According to the NEA’s news announcement, some other key findings include:

 

Culture outpaces other sectors - Over the 15-year period (1998-2013), arts and cultural production grew by $165 billion or 32.5 percent. The annual growth rate for arts and culture as a whole (1.8 percent) was on par with that of the total U.S. economy (1.9 percent). But it grew faster than other sectors such as accommodation and food services (1.4 percent), retail trade (1.3 percent), and transportation and warehousing (1.1 percent).

 

Arts employment - In 2013, arts and cultural sector employed 4.7 million wage and salary workers, earning $339 billion. Industries employing the largest number of ACPSA workers include government (including school-based arts education), retail trade, broadcasting, motion picture industries, and publishing.

 

Learn more about the Arts and Cultural Production Satellite Account report and results.

 

Americans for the Arts also produces a number of annual publications, e-newsletters, and reports that provide a quantitative, measurable impact of the arts in America. For example, while most economic impact studies of the arts have focused on the nonprofit sector (such as our own Arts and Economic Prosperity studies), Americans for the Arts’ Creative Industries is the first national economic impact study that encompasses both the nonprofit andfor-profit arts industries. Reports for all 435 U.S. Congressional Districts, the 50 states and the District of Columbia, the 7,500 state legislative districts, and all 3,143 U.S. counties—as well as a full suite of user tools and a comprehensive list of the industries included—are available for download

 

Sign up for BCA Noteworthy, our monthly business and arts partnerships newsletter, to learn about new research and resources to help you build and promote your arts partnerships, and hear from other business leaders engaging with the arts.

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Diversity is a Priority for Businesses. The Arts Can Help.

Posted by Stacy Lasner
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Diversity is a Priority for Businesses. The Arts Can Help.

According to a 2015 survey from Human Capital Media Advisory Group, the research arm of Talent Management magazine,"Almost three-quarters of human resources practitioners (72 percent) see diversity and inclusion as a strategic enabler for their companies' business strategy." Celebrating diversity communicates to employees, future employees, and customers that the company embraces an open exchange of ideas, which indicates a culture of teamwork and innovation.

 

However, 14 percent of respondents said diversity is a necessary but expensive contributor to the business.

 

The arts create an environment that blends backgrounds, ethnicities, and cultures, and can provide simple, affordable ways for businesses to celebrate diversity. For example, many companies such as 2014 BCA 10 honorees BBVA Compass and PECO celebrate diversity by supporting multi-cultural initiatives in the community or displaying local art within their offices. Businesses can also encourage their employees to attend multi-cultural arts events by supplying free or discounted tickets or organizing group trips.

 

Employee Resource Groups are another avenue for celebrating diversity, and the arts can help these groups achieve many of their goals, whether they aim to cultivate understanding or enhance the company's recruitment efforts. For more information about how the arts can help Employee Resource Groups, check out this pARTnership Movement tool-kit.

 

Find more examples of how the arts help celebrate diversity and builds teamwork.

 

How does your business engage with the arts to celebrate diversity? Tell us on Twitter using #ArtsandBiz or email us at partnership@artsusa.org.

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Spotlighting Your Arts Engagement on Social Media

Posted by Stacy Lasner
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Spotlighting Your Arts Engagement on Social Media

A new survey of HR professionals by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) shows that social media has become an essential part of U.S. hiring. Of the 410 HR professionals who took part in the survey, 84 percent said they currently use social media for recruitment and 9 percent said they were planning on using it in the future.

 

According to the survey, "research has shown that although many people are open to new job opportunities, most are 'passive' job seekers and are not actively looking for new employement, and they may pursue an opportunity only if contacted regarding a new job." SHRM also discovered that, "a high percentage of HR professionals are also struggling to find qualified candidates for their vacancies, and the use of social media may help ease that difficulty." 

 

How can the arts help? 77 percent of the HR professionals surveyed claim that social media helps employers recruit by increasing employer brand and recognition, and 56 percent of respondents create an interest in jobs by posting useful information, photos, or video. If your company is fostering a fun and creative environment by engaging with the arts, this is a great way let future employees know!

 

  • Post a recruitment video that showcases your creative culture (like this one from Shopify) or a video of your employees performing at a work function.
  • Create a clever series of sharable recruitment ads like these, or use The pARTnership Movement ads on your social media feed.
  • Promote arts events in your community to attract new employees to the area. For example, 2015 BCA 10 honoree The Trust Company of Kansas underwrote a website dedicated to promoting local arts events in Wichita.

 

Learn more about how the arts helps businesses recruit and retain talent.

 

How do the arts help your business recruit and retain talent? Tell us on Twitter using #ArtsandBiz or email us at partnership@artsusa.org.

 

Photo credit.

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Arts at Work

Posted by Stacy Lasner
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Arts at Work

The Washington Post recently reported on a new study by researchers at Harvard and Stanford that ‘connects unhealthy workplaces with national inequality,’ quantifying how many years your stressful workplace may be shaving off your life. “But your job doesn’t need to be like this, and nor should it,” says Grant Hall, Founder of League Cultural Diplomacy.

 

In a blog post on WhereWordsFailBlog.com, Hall explores the mental health benefits of art and how corporations can benefit from making the arts an integral part of their work.“Properly designed and implemented, it will enhance brand image, help build relationships abroad or across cultures, create the desired corporate culture, inspire innovation and creativity, reduce staff turnover and absenteeism, improve the health and safety record of the workplace and help meet CSR targets,” he says.

 

Hall also provides suggestions for how corporations can encourage employees to engage in healthy arts and cultural activities, including financially supporting employees’ arts activities, displaying employee artwork, or starting a workplace choir.

 

Read the full blog post here, and learn more about bringing the arts into the workplace.

 

Photo: Aetna's employee jazz band.

 

How do the arts help your employees? Tell us on Twitter using #ArtsandBiz or email us at partnership@artsusa.org.

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6 Ways the Arts Can Help Your Business Thrive in 2016

Posted by Stacy Lasner
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Foster Critical Thinking & Innovation

Did you know that GE has a new division called FirstBuild (a 2015 BCA 10 honoree) that brings artists into the factory to help create the next generation of appliances? Or that litigation firm Faegre Baker Daniels LLP uses theater to train its lawyers? The increased demand for customized products and services and the rise in consumer power is leading to an emphasis on continuous innovation. Last year we learned from BCA 10 honoree U.S. Bank’s CEO Richard Davis that CEOs representing the country’s top companies now believe that creativity is the most important attribute of a future C-Suite senior leader. Americans for the Arts’ and The Conference Board’s Ready to Innovate study also supports their claim.

 

To learn how businesses are using the arts to foster critical thinking and drive innovation, read this essayYou can find additional examples here.

 

Engage Employees, Especially Millennials

2014 BCA 10 honoree Hallmark displays employee art. Facebook offers art classes to employees. 2015 BCA 10 honoree NV Energy's employees volunteer with local arts organizations and at arts events. “Employee engagement” is not just a buzzword or a passing trend. It holds powerful benefits for businesses. For example, many studies show that employees (particularly millennials) who frequently participate in workplace volunteer activities are more likely to be proud, loyal, and satisfied employees. The arts offers businesses many opportunities to engage employees both in and out of the workplace (a topic we’ll explore more on pARTnershipMovement.org in 2016).

 

Find more examples of how the arts can help engage employees.

 

Recruit & Retain Talent

Creative employees want to live and work in a vibrant community; if you build it, they will come. According to a recent Cone Communications study, 76 percent of millennials consider a company’s social and environmental commitments before deciding where to work. Millennials are also highly mobile. Today’s businesses are not just competing for talent against other companies, but also against other communities, cities, states, and countries. In 2014, a survey by ManpowerGroup showed that 40 percent of U.S. employers have difficulty filling jobs. How do communities like Des Moines, Iowa and Corning, New York attract top employees? They invest heavily in local arts and culture.

 

For an example of how business support of the arts helps attract creative talent, read this essay about the transformation of Des Moines. You can find additional examples here.

 

Put Your Company in the Spotlight

In 2015, BCA 10 company Zions Bank showcased costumes from a local ballet company in the bank’s branches, which resulted in substantial media coverage and increased visitors for both the bank and the ballet. Celebrating the arts is a way to build a powerful presence and engage with multiple stakeholders quickly and effectively. According to Americans for the Arts’ BCA National Survey of Business Support of the Arts (the next iteration of which will be released in 2016), 79 percent of businesses agree that the arts increase name recognition.

 

To learn how Portland General Electric partnered with the arts to build an emotional connection to their intangible product, read this essay. Learn about other ways the arts can help you put your business in the spotlight.

 

Advance Corporate Objectives & Strategies

Over the holidays, competitors Apple and Microsoft both sent powerful messages to consumers through music. In August 2015, Google demonstrated its support of people with disabilities through a visual display on the steps of prominent buildings in Washington DC, which also called attention to Google’s Cultural Institute. The arts are an incredibly effective way of breaking through to audiences facing information overload. Consider the flash mob trend and the rise of video in marketing. According to an article in The Guardian quoting research by Cisco, by 2017, video will account for 69% of all consumer internet traffic.

 

Learn how other businesses are using the arts to advance corporate objectives and communicate strategic messages in this essay, and find additional examples here.

                                                               

Contribute to the Economy & Quality of Life

When you partner with local arts, you partner with the whole city. The arts enhance community development, create jobs, spur urban renewal, attract new businesses, draw tourism dollars, and more. Nationally, the nonprofit arts and culture industry generates $135.2 billion in economic activity every year—$61.1 billion in spending by organizations and an additional $74.1 billion in event-related spending by their audiences. For 2015 BCA 10 honoree, commercial real estate firm Prospective Inc., the impact of the arts on the company’s bottom line is undeniable. “The impact of the arts on demand for office, retail, and residential real estate, result(s) in higher valuations of commercial and residential properties and increased tax revenues to local, county, and state government. Investment in the arts provides a powerful economic return,” said Joe Ritchey, Principal of Prospective Inc.

 

Read more about how supporting the arts helps contribute to the economy and check out how other businesses are contributing to their local economies through the arts.

 

Want to learn more? Find additional ways that the arts can help your business thrive in 2016.

 

How has partnering with the arts impacted your business? Tell us on Twitter using #ArtsandBiz or email us at pARTnership@artsusa.org.

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