News

Arts and business news from around the country.

RSS

You Can’t Spell Earth Day without ART!

Posted by Jessica Gaines
0 Comments
You Can’t Spell Earth Day without ART!

Just in time for Earth Day on April 22nd - as mentioned in the pARTnership Movement essay “Advancing Corporate Objectives and Strategies”, Subaru has taken to encouraging use of the arts to reiterate their corporate message.

 

Car manufacturer, Subaru, is a “zero landfill” company, meaning it sends none of its waste to landfills. In fact, the Subaru plant recycles 99.99% of its waste and considers its expertise in the area the art of reduce, reuse, and recycle! In 2015, Subaru decided to bring their expertise and zero landfill concept to the parks to reduce national waste with Grand Teton National Park (GTNP) apart of the pilot program.

 

Subaru has several techniques to prepare its waste for reuse or recycling, such as separating food waste for composting and sending the dust produced from weld slag to a recycling facility where copper and other metals are reclaimed. Over the years, Subaru has shared its zero landfill techniques with hundreds of businesses, schools and organizations to benchmark their own zero landfill goals.

 

In a recent collaboration with GTNP, Subaru presented an eco-centered arts challenge to FabLab students from Jackson Hole High School. (FabLab is shorthand for digital fabrication lab, an elective program that teaches students how to envision, design, and make innovative projects.) These students were invited to design concepts – fun, innovative, practicable, scalable.

 

Over a school year’s time, including observation of the recycling center and the park, the students developed concepts which they presented to a panel of Subaru and GTNP leadership. The panel selected two projects that will eventually be installed at GTNP – a recycling bin in the shape of a mountain range that uses clear imagery to aid visitors in self-sorting and “STREAM”, a large art installation that shows the amount of plastic bottle waste in a single day in the park.

 

This pARTnership not only helps the students imagine themselves as designers but, in keeping with Subaru’s eco-friendly messaging, helps remind the park’s visitors about their impact on the environment.

 

 

Photo: Models of the STREAM project conceived by Jackson Hole High School students.

Related

BCA 10 Honoree on the Economic Impact of Public Art

Posted by Stacy Lasner
0 Comments
BCA 10 Honoree on the Economic Impact of Public Art

“I believe that a community’s economic vitality and quality of life are directly proportionate to its commitment to and investment in arts and culture. The arts provides a powerful economic return.” – Joe Ritchey, Principal, Prospective Inc.

 

For Joe Ritchey of Prospective Inc., a one-person commercial real-estate brokerage and consulting firm in Reston, VA that has been selected as a BCA 10 honoree this year for partnering with the arts, having a thriving local arts scene is an essential part of his company’s success and the city’s growth. Not only does Prospective lease office space in Reston Town Center, Ritchey has also been instrumental in transforming Reston Town Center into a vibrant public space with outdoor concerts and public art.

 

In his recent post on Americans for the Arts’ ARTSblog, Ritchey discusses how public art has helped transform Reston into a place where people want to live and work.

 

Join us for a webinar on September 9 at 3 p.m. ET to hear Ritchey talk more about public art’s economic return. He will be joined by the Director of the Initiative for Public Art– Reston (IPAR), an organization which he founded.

 

Learn more about IPAR by watching this video, which was part of "Reston: The Art of Community," displayed at Dulles International Airport in 2014.

 

 

Photo: © Initiative for Public Art – Reston.

Related

Shake Shack Reaches New Heights in Center City

Posted by Brooke LaRue
0 Comments
Shake Shack Reaches New Heights in Center City

At Americans for the Arts, we know that public art instills meaning—a greater sense of identity and understanding of where we live, work, and visit—creating memorable experiences for all. Throughout the United States, businesses are participating in public art projects as a way to partner with the whole city.

 

Philadelphia’s Center City Shake Shack and the city’s Mural Arts program joined forces in summer 2014 to bring a large public mural to the previously blank wall above the restaurant. Mural Arts has been the official charity partner of the Shake Shack location since it opened three years ago, with 5 percent of the sale of the Center City Pretzel frozen custard concrete going to Mural Arts, but through this project, the partnership reached new heights.

 

David Guinn, a Philadelphia based artist, was commissioned to create the mural entitled Summer Rendezvous, which depicts a colorful green-space featuring a young boy on a ladder handing an ice cream cone to a girl in a window. Guinn drew inspiration from the original wall of greenery that surrounded the location during Shake Shack’s construction and the plants that grow on the restaurant’s roof. Shake Shack’s press release states, “Reinforced by the plantings that decorate the roof year-round, the mural presents a fantasy of plants growing up the building wall, framing the whimsical encounter between the children.”

 

According to Mural Arts’ website, the organization “was first established in 1984 as part of the Philadelphia Anti-Graffiti Network’s effort to eradicate the city’s graffiti crisis. Artist Jane Golden was hired to reach out to graffiti writers and redirect their energies to constructive public art projects. In addition to addressing the problem of graffiti, Mural Arts’ collective mural-making processes proved to be a powerful tool for generating dialogue, building relationships, empowering communities, and sparking economic revitalization.”

 

Shake Shack’s arts and business partnership brought community members together. Philadelphians were invited to take part in a public paint day to help create this new must-see destination in the city, and a public dedication ceremony was held in December.

 

Is there a local business that helped bring public art to your community? We want to hear from you. Share your story by email or by using #ArtsandBiz on Twitter.

 

Learn more about public art throughout the United States.
 

Related

TD Bank Greenifies NYC with Art for Trees

Posted by Kellyn Lopes
0 Comments
TD Bank Greenifies NYC with Art for Trees

(Image courtesy of Ads of the World.)

 

Last month, TD Bank paired up with MillionTreesNYC, a borough-wide effort to secure urban forests, by planting and maintaining a million trees throughout the city. A group of ten artists commissioned by the bank and selected by art curator Bridgette Mayer have created original tree-inspired works to be displayed in the windows of New York’s 115 branches.

 

The campaign is a creative way for TD Bank to reiterate its commitments to environmental sustainability. Targeting environmentalists, artists, and of course, New Yorkers, Art for Trees is a way for TD Bank to engage and enhance the community. 

 

In conjunction with the campaign, TD Bank released a series of videos of each of the artists speaking about their work on the project and environmental awareness. Eileen Neff, whose photographs are included in the campaign, was particularly pleased with TD Bank’s social and environmental stewardship, explained, “I read a lot about [TD Bank], and it was kind of stunning what they’re doing.”

 

The original artworks will be shown at pop-up galleries around the city. Proceeds from the sale of the original pieces will be distributed to the New York Restoration Project, Friends of the High Line, Brooklyn Botanic Garden and Trees New York.

 

The Art for Trees campaign notes, “Art finds a cause. Green finds a way. And we’re one step further in coloring the communities we serve.”

 

For more information on Art for Trees, visit TDForestsNYC.com.

Related

AC Entertainment Not Only Presents, but Partners with the Arts

Posted by Kellyn Lopes
0 Comments

Praised by Rolling Stone as “one of the 50 moments that changed the history of rock ‘n roll,” the Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival features more than 150 artists and attracts an audience of 80,000 each year. Since 2002, the festival has presented the highest-quality musicians ranging in style from bluegrass, jazz, folk, country, reggae, blues, electronic, hip-hop, Latin, African, and more. The 100-acre entertainment village of Bonnaroo is a cultural hub, comprised of art installations, a comedy club, movie theatre, street performers, silent disco, arcade, beer garden, technology village and an impressive array of food and shopping. The brains behind the operation? AC Entertainment, a 2014 BCA 10 honoree.

 

AC Entertainment not only presents the arts, but partners with the arts as well. The company has partnered with the Metropolitan Nashville Airport Authority on a program known as Arts at the Airport, designed to turn the airport terminal and surrounding facilities into a space for rotating public art exhibits and permanent acquisitions.

 

“A part of the Bonnaroo founding mission is to emphasize the impact that the festival has on creativity in both the visual and live performance arts,” said Ashley Capps, CEO of AC Entertainment, in an interview with Pollstar. “The Arts at the Airport is an ever-growing, ever-changing showcase of cultural diversity and creative talent in Tennessee, and we’re proud to have the festival represented on such a grand scale.”

 

In 2014, AC Entertainment called for artists to submit Bonnaroo-inspired artworks, selecting 3 to be installed in the airport concourses (shown below). The overhanging displays are a powerful presence that engage travelers and promote the festival in a new way, offering a creative marketing solution for AC Entertainment that brings together local artists, festival goers, and the community.

 

Concourse A

"EYEZ on Bonnaroo" by Peat Wollaeger

Concourse B

"Amaranth Tactical Co-Mission: AK- BNA1 and AK-BNA2" by AK Llamas

Concourse C

"Just a Perfect Day" by Carla Ciuffo

"Spectrum Wind" by Duncan McDaniel

(Images courtesy of Bonnaroo.com.)

 

The 2014 Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival has concluded for this year, but the airport installations will remain until January 2015. They stand as a reflection of AC Entertainment’s arts partnerships that have become intertwined with the company’s core mission and values.

 

For more information on AC Entertainment and the company's support of the arts through its various festivals and events, visit ACEntertainment.com.

Related

For Brooks Resources, Partnering with the Arts Means Partnering with the Whole City

Posted by Kellyn Lopes
0 Comments

Brooks Resources Corporation has been a pivotal character in the story of Bend, Oregon and its transformation from a frontier settlement to timber boomtown to a culturally saturated, diverse city. Deeply rooted in the Bend community, Brooks Resources has been recognized for multiple awards, demonstrating its ethical responsibility, integrity, and social and environmental stewardship. Americans for the Arts is proud to recognize Brooks Resources as a 2014 BCA 10 honoree for its incredible commitment to the arts in the Bend community. (Photo credit: High Desert Spiral, John Fleming 2013, Steel. Mt. Washington Drive & Simpson Roundabout. Bend, Oregon.)

 

Brooks Resources, along with Brooks-Scanlon, Inc., established the Bend Foundation, which supported the creation of Art in Public Places. Since 1973, Art in Public Places has enlivened the Bend community with art works that enhance the cultural landscape and quality of life for its citizens, and encourage visitors to the area. Art in Public Places was recognized by Americans for the Arts in 2005 as one of the 37 Most Innovative Approaches to Public Art, for its significant public art initiatives in a small community.

 

In addition, Brooks Resources has been a leader in cultivating funds for public art installations in Bend. Notable initiatives include ArtMatch—a matching gift program to raise $1 million to purchase and install art, and significant contributions to local social service and arts organizations, such as Arts Central, the Tower Theatre, and the Bowman Museum.

 

Through its active partnerships with the arts, Brooks Resources recognizes its major stakeholders—the Bend community. Art in Public Places is a driving force of economic growth that encourages tourism, job creation and urban renewal. Brooks Resources’ collaborative efforts confirm that partnering with the arts is a valuable investment in the community in which its clients and employees live and work.

 

For more information on 2014 BCA 10 honoree Brooks Resources Corporation, visit Brooks-Resources.com.

Related

Socrates Sculpture Park Means Business in Midtown

Posted by Caleb Way
0 Comments

Socrates Sculpture Park’s Fact of the Matter exhibit closed this past Friday after its four-month run in the 1285 Avenue of the Americas Art Gallery. The unique Manhattan display featured the work of nine sculptors as they explored the relationship between material and artist.

 

This relationship, however, was not the only one on display. Jones Lang LaSalle, who manages this space, has solidified a longstanding commitment to the arts through its work in this lobby gallery. They sponsor four exhibitions each year – providing a platform for local arts and cultural organizations to highlight their work and expand their audience.

 

In the case of Socrates Sculpture Park, located in Long Island City, the partnership with Jones Lang LaSalle increased accessibility while reflecting Socrates' rich history and commitment to presenting large-scale artworks in the public realm. On the other hand, the employees and clients that pass through this space every day are exposed to a creative expression of arts and culture in the workplace. This partnership, and others like it, brought vibrancy to a setting that many employees spend a majority of their time, played a role in inspiring creativity, and blended two worlds that may have never crossed paths otherwise. 

 

Read more about the Fact of the Matter exhibition here.

Related

Arts Brookfield Presents an Egg-cellent Performance

Posted by Nicole Glotzer
0 Comments

As part of Americans for the Arts’ Internship Program, my fellow interns and staff recently took an office field trip to see a unique public dance performance entitled Yolk by dance company Third Rail Projects. The performance was part of a series of events presented this spring at locations throughout Manhattan by Arts Brookfield, the cultural arm of Brookfield Office Properties. Yolk ran from April 8-10 at the plaza of the Grace Building, a Brookfield property located in Midtown Manhattan.

The piece featured two performers, one dressed in silver, the other in gold, dancing in and around large open eggshells accompanied by electronic music. Third Rail Projects is a multi-disciplinary performance company, and Yolk showcased its explorations fusing dance, installation art, and performance in the public sphere. I watched as a crowd, made up of passersby and employees from nearby businesses (particularly the Grace Building), gathered to view the performance during their lunch hour. I was able to see, firsthand, how such a performance could engage employees of the Grace Building and surrounding businesses. It was then that I realized that the performance was less about two girls dancing in fiberglass eggs, but rather the experience it was creating for those in attendance.

Brookfield Office Properties, a commercial real estate company, presents arts programming to over 25 buildings worldwide. Since the establishment of Arts Brookfield in 1988, the company has been a leader in creating partnerships between the arts and its business partners by offering free-to-the-public performances and exhibitions. Hosting arts performances and events is just one tool that Brookfield Offices Properties uses to reach new leasing business customers and their employees. By providing a relatively untapped incentive to its lessees through the arts, Brookfield Office Properties is able to build its competitive advantage while enriching the community in which its employees and business partners live and work. It is a model from which other businesses should garner inspiration—looking to the arts as an ally that can assist in meeting business goals.

Learn more about Arts Brookfield’s model and mission, and the series of performances it is presenting not only in New York City but across the globe in all of its operational communities, at ArtsBrookfield.com.

As part of Americans for the Arts’ Internship Program, my fellow interns and staff recently took an office field trip to see a unique public dance performance entitled Yolk by dance company Third Rail Projects. The performance was part of a series of events presented this spring at locations throughout Manhattan by Arts Brookfield, the cultural arm of Brookfield Office Properties. Yolk ran from April 8-10 at the plaza of the Grace Building, a Brookfield property located in Midtown Manhattan.

The piece featured two performers, one dressed in silver, the other in gold, dancing in and around large open eggshells accompanied by electronic music. Third Rail Projects is a multi-disciplinary performance company, and Yolk showcased Third Rail Projects’ explorations fusing dance, installation art, and performance in the public sphere. I watched as a crowd, made up of passersby and employees from nearby businesses (particularly the Grace Building), gathered to view the performance during their lunch hour and was able to see, firsthand, how such a performance could engage employees of the Grace Building and surrounding businesses. It was then that I realized that the performance was less about two girls dancing in fiberglass eggs, but rather the experience it was creating for those in attendance.

Brookfield Office Properties, a commercial real estate company, presents arts programming to over 25 buildings worldwide. Since the establishment of Arts Brookfield in 1988, the company has been a leader in creating partnerships between the arts and its business partners by offering free-to-the-public performances and exhibitions. Hosting arts performances and events is just one tool that Brookfield Offices Properties uses to reach new leasing business customers and their employees. By providing a relatively untapped incentive to its lessees through the arts, Brookfield Office Properties is able to build its competitive advantage while enriching the community in which its employees and business partners live and work. It is a model from which other businesses should garner inspiration—looking to the arts as an ally that can assist in meeting business goals.

Learn more about Arts Brookfield’s model and mission, and the series of performances it is presenting not only in New York City but across the globe in all of its operational communities, at ArtsBrookfield.com.

- See more at: http://blog.artsusa.org/2014/05/02/arts-brookfield-presents-an-egg-cellent-performance/#more-23785
Related

Fendi Tosses Coins into the Trevi

Posted by Patrick O'Herron
0 Comments
Fendi Tosses Coins into the Trevi

The iconic Trevi Fountain, one of Rome’s oldest and most revered tourist attractions, will soon be getting a face lift, thanks to Fendi.  The Italian-based fashion house is sponsoring an estimated €2.18 million (US$2.93 million) restoration of the fountain. In addition, Fendi will sponsor a restoration of the Quattro Fontane, the "Four Fountains," another attraction in Rome, for €320,000 (US$430,000), bringing the overall Fendi donation to €2.5 million (US$3.4 million).

 

The Trevi project is expected to last about 20 months, but will be conducted in stages so tourists can continue to visit the landmark. Locals and tourists toss coins into the Trevi Fountain as a fabled wish to return to Rome again.

 

Pietro Beccari, Fendi's chairman and CEO, states that the sponsorship is about reinforcing the brand's historic links with Rome, where it started as a modest handbag and fur shop in the years between the world wars. "There is an element of giving back to the city that has hosted us since 1925," he said.

 

Fendi’s Creative Director, Karl Lagerfeld, states, "It's a great idea. It's a great project, because this fountain is famous in all the world, like the Colosseum or St. Peter's, and I'm happy that we can all help." Lagerfeld will be producing a series of photographs of famous Roman monuments to accompany the renovation.

 

Fendi is only the latest Italian fashion company to step forward with financial aid for the country's cultural heritage. The news follows last year's announcements of a €25 million (US$33.6 million) restoration of the Colosseum being financed by Tod's, and a €5 million (US$6.73 million) restoration of Venice's Rialto Bridge by Diesel.

 

The Fendi restoration of the Trevi Fountain will be commemorated by Fendi logos on signs during the restoration period, and a small plaque of appreciation upon completion. The project is expected to be finished by 2015, and the fountain will not be closed to visitors during that time.

 

For more information, visit Fendi.

Supporting the Arts in Style

Posted by Patrick O'Herron
0 Comments
Supporting the Arts in Style

From the outside, Caramel Boutique is one of several other shops, salons and cafes along Washington, DC’s U Street, but inside, Caramel is anything but your average clothing store.  While they stock international, national and local designers, belts, jewelry and ever-changing artwork, the store is also host to art shows for local artists on a monthly basis, free of charge.

 

Caramel displays work by local artists throughout its space, featuring a new artist approximately every one to two months. The store is also a long-time business supporter of the Mid City Artists, a diverse group of professional artists who promote their artwork and the Dupont/Logan neighborhoods of Washington, DC that they call home. Caramel has collaborated with members of the Mid City Artists to display their work during their twice-yearly Open Studios weekends.

 

Sarah Watkins, owner of Caramel Boutique, drew inspiration from her grandparents who owned and operated independent grocery stores for 40 years. (Incidentally, the store is named after Sarah’s grandfather’s favorite candy.) Growing up in a family business environment, Watkins always hoped to open her own business one day. Most of her professional career has been spent managing educational programs and fundraising for nonprofit organizations, and she continues to work as a part-time professional fundraiser while she manages the store.

 

When asked why she chose to integrate the arts into her business, Watkins stated, “Featuring local artwork at Caramel was part of my initial business plan. When we first opened, we had a number of artists represented in the store. Roughly one year into operation, we began featuring just one artist at a time (sometimes two if artists wished to have a joint show) and organizing opening receptions for each exhibit… One of my goals was to become an active part of the community. I felt working with local artists and displaying their work was a nice way to include more people from the neighborhood and encourage individuals to come into the store not only to shop but also to appreciate the featured artwork.”

 

Hosting art exhibits and opening receptions has sparked interest in other types of events at Caramel, such as fundraisers for local nonprofits, book readings, trunk shows with local designers, meet-up groups, and styling events. Additionally, other local businesses in the neighborhood have begun to feature local artists, and are supporting the Mid City Artists as well. Caramel has collaborated with the Joan Hisaoka Healing Arts Galley, just across the street, to cross-promote openings that are scheduled for the same evening.

 

For more information on Caramel Boutique, visit www.caramelfashion.com.

 

 

More News

Arts Brookfield Presents
Oct 17, 2012 0 Comments
The New York Times recently did a piece on Brookfield Office Properties and its strong arts involvement with the establishment of Arts Brookfield. Here’s a little bit about what Brookfield is doing. And to read the New York Times...
Go to full post
Greater Lansing's Art in the Sky
Mar 21, 2012 0 Comments
Driving around Greater Lansing, MI, commuters may be surprised to discover 672-square-foot works of art on area billboards that normally carry advertising. These artful billboards can be found in the sky along the highways leading...
Go to full post

Already a partner?

Already a partner?

Learn easy ways to take your partnership to a new level.

Use our ads locally

Use our ads locally

View The pARTnership Movement ad campaign and find ways to use the ads.

pARTnership videos

pARTnership videos

Watch and share our videos from The pARTnership Movement.

Partnership ideas

Partnership ideas

Inspire employees with tickets to the ballet or a concert.

Are you an arts group?

Are you an arts group?

Get listed in our searchable directory.

Recruit talent

Recruit talent

Employees want to live and work in a vibrant community.