News

Arts and business news from around the country.

RSS

New Essay on Engaging Employees Through Art Partnerships

Posted by Stacy Lasner
0 Comments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In 2014, a Society of Human Resource Management study found that employees in the United States remain only moderately tuned in at work. Gallup took this a step further, reporting that we’re in the midst of an “employee engagement crisis.” In June 2013, Gallup had estimated that “actively disengaged” employees cost the United States $450 to $550 billion per year in lost productivity in its report, “How to Tackle U.S. Employees’ Stagnating Engagement.”

 

How can companies combat this problem and boost workforce engagement? Mark
Royal, a consultant at the management consulting firm Hay Group, says that engagement tends to be deeper among employees who feel that they have opportunities for growth and development. “The problem for organizations is that demand for such opportunities frequently outpaces the available supply,” he says.

 

By partnering with arts organizations, companies can provide employees with innovative opportunities for growth and development, which can in turn have positive effects on engagement, morale, retention, and performance.

 

In our new essay in the pARTnership Movement essay series, we explore how the Arts & Science Council's Cultural Leadership Training (CLT) Program in Charlotte and the Center of Creative Arts' COCAbiz program in St. Louis helps business employees learn how to serve on boards, develop leadership, and communications skills, and enhance creativity and collaboration. The programs also help businesses determine the leadership potential of their employees based on their interest in participating in these training programs.

 

Download the essay here

 

“People become experts at their jobs by doing the same thing many times. But repetition
can lead people to get stuck in a cognitive rut where it becomes hard to see new
perspectives,” explains Steve Knight, Director of COCAbiz. “We use artistic experiences as a way to help people escape from those mental ruts and rise above their normal routines to find new solutions and opportunities.”

 

“Our company has a lot of scientists, so we were not sure whether an arts-based
development program would be a good fit,” admits Anne Schuchardt, Leadership Development Project Manager for the multinational agricultural company Monsanto. “It turned out that innovation and experimentation which underpin the arts are also really important for scientists. As a result, our employees have jumped in and embraced the artistic lessons that COCAbiz delivers.”

 

Hear more about COCAbiz in our upcoming webinar on March 16.

 

Read more about engaging employees through the arts, and find case studies.

 

Get more information about and examples of arts and business partnerships by signing up for our monthly newsletter, BCA Noteworthy.

 

Have you used the arts to train and engage your business's employees? We want to hear from you. Share you story on Twitter with @Americans4Arts using #ArtsandBiz or email us at pARTnership@artsusa.org.

 

Photos: Courtesy of the Center of Creative Arts.

Related

U.S. Bank and others Honored at the Arts Breakfast of Champions

Posted by Stacy Lasner
0 Comments
U.S. Bank and others Honored at the Arts Breakfast of Champions

More than 340 guests joined the Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) and RACC’s Business Committee for the Arts at the Portland Art Museum on February 24, 2016 for the organization’s annual Arts Breakfast of Champions.

 

“We wanted to celebrate not only the generosity of businesses who support the arts but also the vital role arts and artists play in making Portland a wonderful place to do business, visit, give voice to our diversity, educate our young people and live in a thriving creative environment,” said Eloise Damrosch, RACC’s Executive Director, about the event.

 

This year’s breakfast honored several businesses in the Portland, Oregon region, including some who had previously been recognized by Americans for the Arts as BCA 10: Best Businesses Partnering with the Arts in America honorees, such as:

 

  

U.S. Bank (2015 BCA 10 honoree)

 

 

 Portland General Electric (2010 BCA 10 honoree)

 

Boeing Company (2007 and 2006 BCA 10 honoree)

 

 Wells Fargo & Company (2005 BCA 10 honoree)

 

“Support for the arts has many benefits for artists and audiences, such as providing exposure to cultural diversity, promoting self-expression, initiating creative problem solving, building economic prosperity, and enhancing quality of life,” U.S. Bank’s Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer Richard Davis said upon being named a BCA 10 recipient in 2015. “The numerous partnerships between businesses and arts organizations serve to foster civic pride and create sustainable cultural institutions, making our communities better places for everyone to live, work, and play.” Watch a video of Richard Davis’s acceptance speech at the BCA 10 here.

 

 

The Arts Breakfast of Champions also saluted US Representative from Oregon Suzanne Bonamici, who helped to start the Congressional STEAM Caucus and most recently was able to amend the new Every Student Succeeds Act (replacing No Child Left Behind) to add the arts as a part of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) programs.

 

 

The Arts Breakfast of Champions was established in 1995 by Northwest Business for Culture and the Arts (NWBCA) as an annual celebration of corporate philanthropy. RACC has established a new Business Committee for the Arts (BCA) that is continuing the breakfast event to recognize top corporate donors to the arts, and to provide motivating examples of how businesses are using the arts to inspire employees, stimulate innovation and foster creative collaboration.

 

Congratulations to all of the honorees!

 

Photo: Andie Petkus Photography

Related

The pARTnership Movement Takes a Trip to Miami

Posted by Jordan Shue
0 Comments
The pARTnership Movement Takes a Trip to Miami

In January 2016, Jordan Shue of Americans for the Arts led a pARTnership Movement workshop for members of the Arts & Business Council of Miami’s Miami Arts Marketing Project (MAMP). The focus of the session was how arts organizations and businesses can benefit from designing and implementing cohesive partnership strategies that are mutually beneficial.

 

The interactive workshop encouraged participants to think outside the box about how to present themselves as potential partners to businesses, as well as how to diversify their proposals for partnerships. Participants were encouraged to think beyond traditional sponsorships, and look to unconventional business with which to partner; one group developed a proposal to partner a waste treatment plant. To learn more about the details of the workshop, read a recap of the event on Artburst, a multi-platform media bureau for the arts in Miami from the Arts & Business Council of Miami.


Attendees used the 8 reasons to partner with the arts as a guide during the activities. Among these, the advantages of community involvement and economic development have proven true for Miami local, Jorge Pérez of The Related Group and Pérez Art Museum, whose commitment to partnering with the arts led to his receiving the BCA Leadership Award in 2015. Workshop leaders identified ways that arts organizations can build relationships with business leaders like Pérez, through value proposition outreach.

 

The pARTnership Movement, largely through resources online, equips arts agencies with the knowledge to identify and articulate mutually beneficial partnerships. From tool-kits to success stories to research, it aims to ensure that all local arts agencies have the tools to build partnerships, and that businesses ready to work with the arts are able to match themselves with local arts groups.

 

However, if local groups want more hands-on training, a local pARTnership Movement workshop is a fantastic option. Through workshops like this, arts organizations can get ideas on how to communicate the benefits of the arts and the value of a creative workforce to would-be business partners, with the in-person support of an Americans for the Arts staff member. For more information on bringing the pARTnership Movement to your community, email pARTnership@artsusa.org.

 

Photo Credit: Arts & Business Council of Miami.

Related

Happy Anniversary to the A&BCs and BCAs!

Posted by Stacy Lasner
0 Comments

The Private Sector Network of Americans for the Arts, which includes organizations like Arts & Business Councils and Business Committees for the Arts, works to promote the message that business sector support for the arts is integral to the success and longevity of the arts, and essential in building communities in which the business sector can thrive.

 

We are excited to celebrate the anniversaries of the following Private Sector Network members this year, who have spent decades working to build partnerships between business and the arts:


50 Years of Arts & Business Council of New York
Arts & Business Council Inc. was created in 1965 by a group of business leaders from the New York Board of Trade, with the purpose of creating closer ties between business and the arts. In 2005, Arts & Business Council Inc. merged with Americans for the Arts; ABC/NY is both a division of AFTA and still its own, separately incorporated nonprofit. With a suite of employee engagement opportunities, programs for college students and young professionals, and a digital matchmaking service for arts organizations / artists, and businesses, ABC/NY strives to continue building meaningful partnerships between the arts and business communities.

A suite of employee engagement opportunities–ranging from team volunteering to arts in the workplace–promotes a deeper level of engagement that can lead to mutually beneficial, long lasting partnerships. Looking forward, ABC/NY strives to continue building meaningful partnerships between the arts and business communities. - See more at: http://blog.americansforthearts.org/2015/08/06/happy-anniversary-to-the-arts-business-council-of-new-york-the-colorado-business-committee-for-the#sthash.JV4y8LuH.dpuf


30 Years of Colorado Business Committee for the Arts
This year marks the Colorado Business Committee for the Arts’ (CBCA) 30th Anniversary. CBCA has a proud legacy of advocating for the arts, championing corporate philanthropy, and convening both the business and cultural sectors to advance Colorado’s creative vitality. Through its advocacy and research efforts, CBCA communicates the positive effects of supporting the arts while honoring innovative partnerships, philanthropy, creative businesses, and leadership.


30 Years of New Hampshire Business Committee for the Arts
The New Hampshire Business Committee for the Arts was formed by leading businesses thirty years ago to educate, motivate, and recognize business support of and participation in the arts; advocate for the value of the arts in economic, social and community development; and facilitate people and projects that enhance engagement in the arts. The organization continues to be led by an outstanding board comprised of the CEOs of its member businesses and the executive director who was engaged thirty years ago to help found the organization.

 

30 Years of Arts & Business Council of Miami
Thirty years ago visionary leaders from the Miami-Dade Department of Cultural Affairs and Greater Miami Chamber got together to form the Arts & Business Council of Miami to help spearhead a cultural movement in the Miami community. As a vital partner to growth A&BC Miami activated the skills and resources of the corporate community to strengthen, enliven, and support the arts. Through civic triumphs and challenges, recessions and economic prosperity, natural disasters and momentous changes, the arts have played a leading role in making Miami into a global city and cosmopolitan destination. For three decades the Arts & Business Council of Miami (A&BC Miami) has provided significant capacity building to Miami-Dade’s cultural organizations through workshops, forums, and outreach that have grown the arts into a billion dollar industry.

 

30 Years of The Arts & Business Council of Chicago

The Arts & Business Council of Chicago offers a unique roster of resources including: pro-bono business consulting expertise; board and leadership development; new board member training and placement; marketing, management, financial training, fundraising and other workshops; and assessment tools–all to help build the capacity and sustainability of small- and mid-sized arts organizations. From individual programs, to the full incubation offered through the breadth of A&BC Chicago services, the goal is to give arts organizations the tools to build and maintain solid infrastructures so they can do what they do best: create!

 

For more information about these organizations, read Private Sector Initiatives Coordinator, Jordan Shue’s special anniversary blog posts on ARTSblog.
 

Related

The Creative Economy: How a Chamber of Commerce and Arts & Business Council Are Changing the Conversation

Posted by Stacy Lasner
0 Comments

In a recent ARTSblog post, Rob Wonderling, President and CEO of the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce, explained how the Chamber partners with the Arts & Business Council of Greater Philadelphia (A&BC) to facilitate the continued growth of the region by breaking down the barriers that separate “arts” from “businesses.”

 

A&BC supports the business aspect of the arts community through volunteer consulting projects, board governance, leadership development programs, and pro bono legal services. The Chamber seeks to influence business-friendly legislation, participates in initiatives to improve education and the community, promotes professional enrichment programs, and provides members with cost-efficient ways to run their businesses. Together they help foster a vibrant cultural community that people want to work in and visit.

 

Learn how A&BC has provided Chamber members with opportunities to develop their skills through the arts and how, by combining their efforts, they provide business, technology, and legal professionals the opportunity to apply their skills to challenges in Greater Philadelphia’s creative sector.
 

Related

Spotlight on Arts & Business Partnerships in Chicago

Posted by Jordan Shue
0 Comments
Spotlight on Arts & Business Partnerships in Chicago

The worlds of arts and business came together on June 13 during Americans for the Arts’ Annual Convention Chicago, when three leaders from the local community came together for a session to discuss best practices in forming mutually beneficial partnerships.

 

Andrew Micheli, the Executive Director of the Arts & Business Council of Chicago; Raaja Nemani, the Co-Founder and CEO of BucketFeet; and Christine Hoisington, Director of Community Partnerships at Booz Allen Hamilton (a 2011 BCA 10 honoree), joined Americans for the Arts’ Vice President of Private Sector Initiatives, Emily Peck, for a frank conversation about what businesses want from partnerships with the arts.

 

Raaja Nemani, who co-founded BucketFeet four years ago after traveling around the world, spoke about the company’s work with Elizabeth’s Canvas, an arts organization dedicated to providing cancer patients, survivors, and their family members with free creative programs. BucketFeet, in addition to supporting arts groups, supports individual artists around the world by commissioning them to design shoes and other products, as well as accepting unsolicited proposals for new products. According to Nemani, “art is an agent of change…a way to bring different people together.”

 

Booz Allen Hamilton’s Christine Hoisington was very clear that businesses are not looking to sign checks for arts organizations; sustainable and mutually beneficial partnerships are way to go. She suggested that since “arts organizations are the best to partner with for employee engagement,” groups could approach businesses with value-added propositions for how the arts can play into a businesses’ goals, rather than seek outright support through traditional means like donations and sponsorships. In addition to supporting the Environmental Film Festival, Booz Allen Hamilton employees volunteer and are involved each year in the event.

 

Employee engagement, particularly through skills-based volunteering, is the way the Arts & Business Council of Chicago began its operations 30 years ago today with its Business Volunteers for the Arts® program. Andrew Micheli spoke of the organization’s push to educate local arts organizations about forming arts and business partnerships. By fostering board placements, engaging business employees through professional volunteering, and more, the Arts & Business of Chicago serves as the local voice for arts in the business community.

 

For more information on partnering with business or building your message, browse through our tool-kits for arts groups.
 

Related

Biotech Bands Battle it out in Boston

Posted by Stacy Lasner
0 Comments

On Wednesday, May 20, 2015, the third annual Battle of the Biotech Bands, hosted by the Arts & Business Council of Boston, took place at Boston’s Royale Nightclub. Described as a fun, community-driven, networking event, Battle of the Biotech Bands features bands associated with Boston-based biotech companies. The bands compete to raise money for a charitable foundation of their choosing. According to the event's website, Battle of the Biotech Bands is “an amazing opportunity for biotech companies and innovators throughout Boston to rock out and partner with architecture, design, and building professionals.”

 

AURAL GAVAGE (Momenta Pharmaceuticals), who played on behalf of The Jolane Solomon Research Fund at Boston College, took home the gold. MOLECULAR GROOVE (PerkinElmer), who played on behalf of The American Cancer Society, and the ZAC MAC BAND (Ironwood Pharmaceuticals), who played on behalf of The Boys & Girls Club of Middlesex County also competed. Merrimack Pharmaceutical's BAD IDEA, the 2014 winner, opened the night.

 

“The Battle of the Biotech Bands is truly a unique event that brings together individuals from across the building and life science spectrum – a networking opportunity that doesn’t feel like you’re networking,” said Carly Bassett, Co-Chair, Battle of the Biotech Bands. “It’s about the music, charitable organizations, and connecting gifted innovators in the biotech industry with the teams of people that help make their organizations possible. Already in our third year, the industry response has grown exponentially. Our hope is to continue this annual tradition for many years to come.”

 

The event was sponsored by a variety of businesses, including Merrill Datasite, a virtual data storage company; Biobridges, a pharmaceutical and biotechnology consulting company; and Choate, a law firm.

 

"Having the opportunity to sponsor the Battle of the Biotech Bands is personally and professionally gratifying," said Jason Falchuk, BioBridges' Managing Partner. "Our life sciences community is made up of brilliant, inspiring people working together to develop breakthrough therapies. Music also unites, inspires, and heals. If I had to choose only one event that captures the pulse of our exceptional community, this is it."

 

Visit the Battle of the Biotech Bands website for more.

Related

Businesses Thrive in Kansas City, Thanks to the Arts

Posted by Kellyn Lopes
0 Comments

Which came first, business or culture? In Kansas City, MO, true partnerships between arts and cultural organizations and the business community have resulted in a thriving economy and strong cultural sphere. A recent article in the Kansas City Star discusses how the arts have helped to shape the local economy and how businesses are benefiting, featuring quotes from the Kansas City Ballet, the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, and other arts and business leaders from the community.

 

ArtsKC, a regional arts council since 1999 and member of Americans for the Arts’ Private Sector Network, was highlighted in the article for its work in bolstering business support for the arts in the city. The article quotes President and CEO Harlan Brownlee: “A lot of businesses have come to conclude that if they are going to drive the talent they need, they need an attractor. We don’t have oceans or mountains, but we do have a vibrant arts community. Young professionals want a stimulating, creative environment. A number of businesses have moved downtown because that is the place to be.”

 

http://artskc.org/repository/2012/06/1-Lobby_8000147_FB-180x180.jpgJim Heeter, President and Chief Executive of the Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce, explainshow thriving arts community offers both tangible and intangible benefits to businesses, pointing to corporate support shifting between charitable contributions and marketing sponsorships.

 

In the past 15 years, Kansas City has worked on strategic partnerships between the arts and business communities to leverage the full potential of economic and cultural development, resulting in a hub for businesses, arts and culture to thrive. Read the full article here.

 

Photo: courtesy of ArtsKC.

Related

Starbucks' Little Big Show Benefits the Arts

Posted by Patrick O'Herron
0 Comments
Starbucks' Little Big Show Benefits the Arts

It’s the little show with a big impact! Starbucks, in tandem with KEXP and the Seattle Theatre Group (STG), presents Little Big Show, a concert series that benefits Seattle-area arts organizations. Little Big Show performances are presented several times throughout the year at Seattle’s historic Neptune Theatre, with 100% of ticket proceeds donated to local arts nonprofits. To date, Little Big Show has raised over $100,000.

 

Little Big Show #10 will be presented on November 15, with Death Cab for Cutie front man Ben Gibbard as the headliner. 100% of each ticket purchased for Little Big Show will go directly to ArtsFund, a member of Americans for the Arts’ private sector network. The proceeds will serve as matching funds for power2give.org/PugetSound, supporting projects benefiting local youth such as artist classroom visits and residencies, scholarships for professional arts training, or free youth tickets to a variety of local arts events.

 

Rodney Hines, director of Community Investments for Starbucks, says, “We look forward to bringing the community together in support of local arts education programs, while celebrating Seattle's musical heritage. And I cannot think of a better way to commemorate our 10th Little Big Show than with ArtsFund whose work truly is to make arts accessible to all and valued as central and critical the health of our community.”

 

"We are grateful to Starbucks, KEXP and STG for their dedication to arts education and for partnering with us," said Mari Horita, President and CEO, ArtsFund and member of Americans for the Arts’ Private Sector Council. "Each ticket purchased for Little Big Show will go directly toward matching funds for power2give.org/PugetSound projects focused on youth programs such as artist classroom visits and residencies, scholarships for low-income youth to professional arts training, and free tickets to a variety of local music, theater and arts events."

 

Check out footage from previous concerts and learn more about Little Big Show concerts at starbucks.com/seattle.

Related

pARTnerships not to be Missed on ARTSblog this week!

Posted by Patrick O'Herron
0 Comments

Whew—what a week it’s been! In case you missed it, we’ve been hosting a blog salon on ARTSblog this week, dedicated to showcasing unique arts and business partnerships. These partnerships are helping businesses engage their employees, attract and retain top-notch talent, evoke creativity in critical thinking and problem solving in the workplace, and adding to the vibrancy of the communities in which they operate. We’ve heard from past and present BCA 10 honorees including Arts Brookfield, Earl Swensson Associates, Golden Artist Colors, Hallmark Cards, Shugoll Research and Travelers—significant voices, as these businesses have been named the best businesses partnering with the arts in America. We’ve also heard from our private sector network—ArtsFund, the Arts & Business Councils of Miami and New York, and Business for Culture & the Arts, to name a few—our army of locals who champion the benefits of arts to business everyday in their own communities. We’ve also heard inspiring stories from many other businesses and organizations who are striving to build and strengthen these arts and business partnerships in their own cities and regions. I welcome to all to join me on ARTSblog for the remainder of this week’s blog salon, and to continually check The pARTnership Movement for the latest news content and success stories from which to garner inspiration! Remember, when arts and businesses partner, everyone profits.

 

Have an interesting arts and business partnership you'd like to tell us about? We collect blog content year-round to promote nationally on The pARTnership Movement and ARTSblog. Contact Patrick O'Herron, Business Committee for the Arts Coordinator, for details.

Related

More News

Americans for the Arts Takes Nashville by Storm for its Annual Convention
Jun 13, 2014 0 Comments
Officially beginning today, Friday, June 13, Americans for the Arts has landed in Nashville for its Annual Convention--a convening of arts and community leaders to network and discuss strategies for building stronger towns, counties...
Go to full post
BCA Executive Board Member Martha Ingram Talks Arts in Nashville
May 19, 2014 0 Comments
In the following video from NewsChannel5.com, businesswoman, philanthropist, arts supporter and BCA Executive Board Member Martha Ingram speaks of her passion for bringing the arts to her hometown of Nashville. (Photo credit...
Go to full post
WEBINAR: Engaging Business Advocates
Apr 23, 2014 0 Comments
Join us for a webinar on Wednesday, April 23 at 3:00 p.m. ET.   Engaging your community’s business and philanthropic leaders as arts advocates and advisors is a goal many arts organizations aspire to but don’t always accomplish...
Go to full post
Business and the arts: Why they need each other
Mar 20, 2014 0 Comments
The goals of the arts, culture and creative sectors are often viewed as separate from or counter to those of the business community. The Arts & Business Council of Greater Philadelphia is working hard to change this perception...
Go to full post

Already a partner?

Already a partner?

Learn easy ways to take your partnership to a new level.

Use our ads locally

Use our ads locally

View The pARTnership Movement ad campaign and find ways to use the ads.

pARTnership videos

pARTnership videos

Watch and share our videos from The pARTnership Movement.

Partnership ideas

Partnership ideas

Inspire employees with tickets to the ballet or a concert.

Are you an arts group?

Are you an arts group?

Get listed in our searchable directory.

Recruit talent

Recruit talent

Employees want to live and work in a vibrant community.