News

Arts and business news from around the country.

RSS

When Leading a Business, When Does Creativity Matter?

Posted by Jessica Gaines
0 Comments

Creativity is vital in today’s business environment, especially as millennials make up the largest generation in the workforce

 

 

 

 

*By now we all have heard that millennials are currently the largest generation in the workforce. 

 

And while I will share some data and implications associated with this fact, it is fair to say that as a non-millennial and proud member of Generation X, many of the needs presented by the millennial generation should be important to businesses looking to support multigenerational workplaces and strong work-life balance.

 

If you’re looking to lead that type of business, then creativity fully matters.

 

Millennials have identified three areas of want from current and prospective employers: professional development, commitment to community service and philanthropy and clarity about the company’s mission and values.

 

Here are three ways infusing creativity into your environment addresses these wants:

 

Professional Development

 

According to SmartCEO, 63 percent of millennials say their leadership skills are not being fully developed by their current employer.

 

By including arts and creativity in the workplace you can bring forth leadership opportunities, unleash originality and solve other business needs. Take notes from

 

Center of Creative Arts, a nationally recognized nonprofit organization that offers dance, theater, voice, art and design but also integrates arts into the core subjects in ways that strengthen students’ understanding of math, science and language arts.

Center of Creative Arts began exploring how its arts educators could help companies unleash creativity and work on key issues and opportunities and realized they could apply the same strategy to business applications — pairing hands-on teaching artists with business facilitators who could map the artistic lessons back to the everyday language business people use and the challenges they face.

 

This helped employees connect with their creative passions and develop skills that aren’t fully explored through work experiences.

 

Commitment to Community Service and Philanthropy

 

According to the SmartCEO survey, about 87 percent of millennials believe the success of a business should be measured by more than just financial performance.

 

Going beyond the numbers, consider gaging your company’s success through opportunities to strengthen employee engagement, encourage personal growth and inspire employees to innovate and collaborate.

 

A few ways to accomplish this: Team training event with artistic elements like improv, movement or visual creation; workplace art programs; corporate art collections; match programs for employees’ arts nonprofit giving; and business volunteer for the arts programs.

 

These efforts can boost philanthropic and community service while purposefully enhancing company value, employee morale and productivity. A treasured outcome, outlined in this pARTnership Movement essay, is “high levels of attachment to the organization and a desire to remain part of that organization and a willingness to go above and beyond the formal requirements of the job by being good corporate citizens, pouring extra effort into their work and delivering superior performance.”

 

Clarity about Values

 

Among those millennials who intend to stay in their current job for at least another five years, 92 percent believe their employer shares their personal values, according to SmartCEO.

 

As employers continue to think about engagement, retention and recruitment strategies, prioritizing creative elements that influence company culture will allow your people to shine and your shared values to align. Employees desire to work for companies that meet their values and in jobs that bring them personal satisfaction.

 

Because of this connection, the city of Des Moines, Iowa, sought to boost appeal with young professionals by including strong artistic doses in the community.

 

In 2015, Forbes called Des Moines the No. 2 best city for jobs. Before that, Forbes named Des Moines the No. 1 best city for young professionals and, in 2014, Fortune named Des Moines the No. 1 city with an up-and-coming downtown. To help generate an environment that people want to stay in or move to, especially between the ages of 25 and 35, artistic hubs like Des Moines Social Club are significant for the community, developing and hosting artistic events while also undertaking a community-building mission. Area businesses can benefit from hubs like DMSC that produce between 700 and 800 events per year and reach an annual audience of more than 240,000 people.

These few examples reiterate two key messages. The first is that employees want to live and work in a vibrant workplace and community. The second is that creative and artistic influences help your company remain more attractive to existing and potential talent.

 

*This article, written by Americans for the Arts BCA Coordinator Jessica Gaines, originally appeared on Talent Economy. Link to the original article is here and appears with permission from the author.

Related

50th Anniversary of "Culture and the Corporation," a Speech by David Rockefeller

Posted by Jessica Gaines
0 Comments

 

50 years ago, at the Conference Board’s 50th anniversary conference, David Rockefeller – former Chairman and CEO of Chase Manhattan Corporation – gave the speech titled “Culture and the Corporation”.  The speech called for the creation of the Business Committee for the Arts to promote partnership between the arts and business communities.  Rockefeller highlighted the public’s confidence in businesses and arts organizations to have “certain standards of good citizenship” and that these organizations “help shape our environment in a constructive way”.

 

-David Rockefeller, 1966

 

As a result of the speech, the Business Committee for the Arts was officially launched in 1967 and is now part of Americans for the Arts. The Business Committee for the Arts encourages, inspires, and stimulates businesses to support the arts in the workplace and in the community.

 

Another result of the speech was the inspiration for our David Rockefeller Lecture Series.  50 years later David Rubenstein – co-founder and CEO of The Carlyle Group, one of the world’s largest private equity firms – revived the lecture series with a passionate speech of his own.

 

Read David Rockefeller's original speech on arts and business, "Culture and the Corporation," and learn more about the David Rockefeller Lecture Series. If you are interested in finding an arts partner, visit the pARTnership movement website.

Related

The Rebirth of the David Rockefeller Lecture Series on Arts & Business

Posted by Jordan Shue
0 Comments
The Rebirth of the David Rockefeller Lecture Series on Arts & Business

“When you promote the arts, you’re promoting the best the human brain can come up with.”

 –David Rubenstein, 2016 David Rockefeller Lecture

 

Last week, the David Rockefeller Lecture on Arts & Business was reborn. 50 years ago David Rockefeller – former Chairman and CEO of Chase Manhattan Corporation – gave the founding address for the Business Committee for the Arts. 50 years later David Rubenstein – co-founder and CEO of The Carlyle Group, one of the world’s largest private equity firms – revived the lecture series with a humble, humorous, and passionate speech to an audience of over 200 at The TimesCenter in Manhattan.

 

After remarks from Americans for the Arts CEO, Bob Lynch, and President and CEO of the Conference Board, Jon Spector, the Jazz at Lincoln Center Youth Orchestra Blakey Ensemble performed a short set for the crowd. Acclaimed singer, Renée Fleming, introduced Rubenstein by outlining his unfailing support for the arts, culture, and history around the country, and thanking him for dedicating so much of his prosperity to charitable causes.

 

Kicking the speech off with a joke that he was asked to speak simply because his initials match David Rockefeller’s, Rubenstein eschewed the podium in favor of standing directly in front of the audience. He balanced the speech with moments of measure and wit, and argued that “business leaders should talk about the arts more commonly than they do. The three central factors in measuring the sustainability and ethical impact of an investment in a company (ESG) should become ESGA: environmental, social, governance, and the arts.” He stressed that when business leaders “promote the arts, they’re promoting the best the human brain can come up with.”

 

After talking about how much he enjoyed the musical sensation, Hamilton, Rubenstein read a playful and imaginary letter from Alexander Hamilton in the afterlife, relaying his regrets for not supporting the arts and design in life as much as Thomas Jefferson did. He closed by saying that we should all learn from Hamilton’s remorse for not recognizing the power of the arts while living, and reaffirmed his commitment to supporting the arts in the community, the workplace, and life.

 

To learn more, check out the video from the lecture on the Americans for the Arts website.

 

Founded in 1967 by Rockefeller, the Business Committee for the Arts encourages, inspires, and stimulates businesses to support the arts in the workplace, in education, and in the community. The lecture series was created to advance Rockefeller’s belief that the arts are essential to free enterprise and human achievement, and to encourage businesses to form alliances with the arts as an expression of their broader responsibility to their communities.

 

Want to follow David Rubenstein’s lead? Find a partner in the arts and get started.

Related

Already a partner?

Already a partner?

Learn easy ways to take your partnership to a new level.

Use our ads locally

Use our ads locally

View The pARTnership Movement ad campaign and find ways to use the ads.

pARTnership videos

pARTnership videos

Watch and share our videos from The pARTnership Movement.

Partnership ideas

Partnership ideas

Inspire employees with tickets to the ballet or a concert.

Are you an arts group?

Are you an arts group?

Get listed in our searchable directory.

Recruit talent

Recruit talent

Employees want to live and work in a vibrant community.