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Arts and Business Spotlight: Portland General Electric BCA10 2010 Awardee

Posted by Mariama Holman
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Arts and Business Spotlight: Portland General Electric BCA10 2010 Awardee

Portland General Electric (PGE), Oregon’s largest electric utility, believes the arts have the power to educate, heal, and create a vibrant economy. When the PGE Foundation was permanently endowed in 1997, one of the three focus areas selected for grantmaking was arts and culture. The first arts grant the Foundation awarded, a $1.5 million grant to the Portland Art Museum, remains the largest single grant ever awarded by PGE. Since 1999, PGE and the PGE Foundation have contributed nearly $5 million to arts and culture.

 

PGE has demonstrated a dedication to incorporating the arts into its corporate culture, while also encouraging other area businesses to follow suit. PGE underwrote the creation of “Creative Differences,” a workplace diversity program the company co-developed with a local arts nonprofit.  What began as a program to teach PGE employees about cultural diversity was then marketed by the company to other area businesses, providing earned income to the nonprofit.

 

Other ways PGE has integrated the arts into its business strategy:  creating school plays with an arts nonprofit that teach children about electrical safety, energy efficiency and renewable energy.  These plays are performed free of charge to 20,000 students each year.  “Arts Contemplates Industry” brings local artists into historic PGE hydroelectric plants to make art which is then exhibited at PGE’s headquarters.  PGE underwrote the development of nonprofit board training for its employees by Business for Culture and the Arts (Portland).  Other businesses now use the program which is a source of revenue for BCA.

 

PGE is known as an early adopter and corporate leader on arts initiatives in Oregon.  The company helped the Regional Arts and Culture Council (RACC) develop the Work for Art workplace giving campaign in 2004.  Every year since, Work for Art has grown at PGE, with the most recent campaign yielding a 38% increase over the year before. 

 

Through board leadership, testimony at public hearings and op-ed pieces in the local media, PGE advocates for the on-going sustainability of Oregon’s arts community.  The company was one of the first private funders of the Creative Advocacy Network that is developing a public funding mechanism for regional arts organizations.  The PGE Foundation also was the first private funder to support The Right Brain Initiative, a program of Young Audiences and RACC that is returning integrated arts education to the region’s public schools.

 

PGE spreads its funding from the largest performing arts companies to small arts education groups.  One year BCA recognized PGE for giving to 77 arts organizations – more than any other company in the region.  PGE’s arts funding has brought playwriting to at-risk youth; writing workshops to the homeless, mentally ill and elderly; visual arts and music to sick children in hospitals and African drumming to developmentally disabled children.

 

Photo: Photo of children painting giant butterflies at the Portland Children’s Museum, which is sponsored by Portland General Electric

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U.S. Bank and others Honored at the Arts Breakfast of Champions

Posted by Stacy Lasner
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U.S. Bank and others Honored at the Arts Breakfast of Champions

More than 340 guests joined the Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) and RACC’s Business Committee for the Arts at the Portland Art Museum on February 24, 2016 for the organization’s annual Arts Breakfast of Champions.

 

“We wanted to celebrate not only the generosity of businesses who support the arts but also the vital role arts and artists play in making Portland a wonderful place to do business, visit, give voice to our diversity, educate our young people and live in a thriving creative environment,” said Eloise Damrosch, RACC’s Executive Director, about the event.

 

This year’s breakfast honored several businesses in the Portland, Oregon region, including some who had previously been recognized by Americans for the Arts as BCA 10: Best Businesses Partnering with the Arts in America honorees, such as:

 

  

U.S. Bank (2015 BCA 10 honoree)

 

 

 Portland General Electric (2010 BCA 10 honoree)

 

Boeing Company (2007 and 2006 BCA 10 honoree)

 

 Wells Fargo & Company (2005 BCA 10 honoree)

 

“Support for the arts has many benefits for artists and audiences, such as providing exposure to cultural diversity, promoting self-expression, initiating creative problem solving, building economic prosperity, and enhancing quality of life,” U.S. Bank’s Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer Richard Davis said upon being named a BCA 10 recipient in 2015. “The numerous partnerships between businesses and arts organizations serve to foster civic pride and create sustainable cultural institutions, making our communities better places for everyone to live, work, and play.” Watch a video of Richard Davis’s acceptance speech at the BCA 10 here.

 

 

The Arts Breakfast of Champions also saluted US Representative from Oregon Suzanne Bonamici, who helped to start the Congressional STEAM Caucus and most recently was able to amend the new Every Student Succeeds Act (replacing No Child Left Behind) to add the arts as a part of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) programs.

 

 

The Arts Breakfast of Champions was established in 1995 by Northwest Business for Culture and the Arts (NWBCA) as an annual celebration of corporate philanthropy. RACC has established a new Business Committee for the Arts (BCA) that is continuing the breakfast event to recognize top corporate donors to the arts, and to provide motivating examples of how businesses are using the arts to inspire employees, stimulate innovation and foster creative collaboration.

 

Congratulations to all of the honorees!

 

Photo: Andie Petkus Photography

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Put Your Company in the Spotlight

Posted by Stacy Lasner
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Launching today, the second essay in The pARTnership Movement essay series, Put Your Company in the Spotlight, explores how engaging with the arts can help a business build market share, enhance its brand, and reach new customers.

 

Featuring research and successful case studies from some of America’s top companies, including Portland General Electric Company (PGE) and Payless ShoeSource, this essay offers insight into why 79% of businesses agree that the arts increases name recognition, and 74% of businesses say the arts offer networking opportunities to developing businesses (2010 BCA National Survey of Business Support for the Arts).

 

By hosting Art Jams, a two-day art-making event at a PGE powerhouse, PGE was able to create a favorable brand image and ensure that the company is viewed as an asset to the community. The arts gave PGE a way to create a personal, emotional connection though electricity, something invisible, intangible, and ethereal.

 

Partnering with the arts “generated a tremendous amount of goodwill toward PGE,” says Jane Reid, chair of the Estacada Arts Commission who worked with PGE on their Art Jams event. “The Art Jams have renewed awareness of PGE’s founding and sustaining role in our community.”

 

For Payless, a partnership with American Ballet Theatre on a new line of ballet shoes gave the brand credibility and helped the company connect with potential new customers.

 

Arts partnerships offer companies effective and cost-efficient methods of achieving critical business goals. Check out the first essay in The pARTnership Movement essay series, Recruit and Retain Talent, to learn how, by partnering with the arts, businesses can attract and retain the talented, motivated people they need in order to gain a competitive edge and outperform the competition.

 

Do you know of a company that partnered with the arts to enhance its brand and reach new customers? We want to hear from you! Tell us about it on Twitter using #ArtsandBiz or email us at pARTnership@artsusa.org.

 

Read more about how top businesses are partnering with the arts to put their company in the spotlight.

 

Learn more about The pARTnership Movement essay series.

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ARTS on Display at The Standard Insurance Company

Posted by Brooke LaRue
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ARTS on Display at The Standard Insurance Company

In May 2015, The Standard, an insurance company with nearly 2,200 employees, held its 5th annual ARTS Project. The ARTS Project, short for Artists in Residence at The Standard, is a weeklong pop-up gallery running in a former law library in the Standard Insurance Center in Portland, Oregon. From attorneys to actuaries and marketing and IT professionals, 35 employees exhibited 60 original works of art, including visual and textile art, as well as jewelry and fashion pieces. This year the Standard added a culinary arts category to the mix.

 

According to an article on OregonianLive.com, ARTS Project began in 2011 as a graduation requirement for company lawyer, Akira Heshiki, who was attending a corporate leadership class sponsored by the Center for Asian Pacific American Women. Heshiki was tasked with developing a program that would enable her to become a better leader by incorporating her “whole self” in the workplace. Heshiki, a photographer, first thought she could share her photographs with her coworkers, but then realized the idea would be most effective if her colleagues could also get involved.

 

"This is just an opportunity for us as employees to gain a fuller picture of the people we work alongside, to see each other as more than just our job titles," Heshiki said. "When you view somebody's art, you get to see their point of view, their struggles, their experiences, and that helps us treat each other better. The added benefit is that we're encouraging innovation and creativity and learning different ways to be problem solvers."

 

According to the article, staff from The Nines, a luxury hotel in Portland, attended one year and was inspired to create their own employee art show. Additionally, members of the Portland community are taking a positive note of The Standard’s project. An associate professor at Portland State University’s School of Business Administration, Ellen West, told OregonianLive.com, “A lot of people equate creativity with being an artist…but everybody has the capability to be creative. I think a business is missing the boat by not offering activities like that. It’s fun and it celebrates the human spirit.”

 

Read more about The Standard’s employee art gallery.

 

Photo credit: George Rede | The Oregonian/OregonLive.

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For Brooks Resources, Partnering with the Arts Means Partnering with the Whole City

Posted by Kellyn Lopes
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Brooks Resources Corporation has been a pivotal character in the story of Bend, Oregon and its transformation from a frontier settlement to timber boomtown to a culturally saturated, diverse city. Deeply rooted in the Bend community, Brooks Resources has been recognized for multiple awards, demonstrating its ethical responsibility, integrity, and social and environmental stewardship. Americans for the Arts is proud to recognize Brooks Resources as a 2014 BCA 10 honoree for its incredible commitment to the arts in the Bend community. (Photo credit: High Desert Spiral, John Fleming 2013, Steel. Mt. Washington Drive & Simpson Roundabout. Bend, Oregon.)

 

Brooks Resources, along with Brooks-Scanlon, Inc., established the Bend Foundation, which supported the creation of Art in Public Places. Since 1973, Art in Public Places has enlivened the Bend community with art works that enhance the cultural landscape and quality of life for its citizens, and encourage visitors to the area. Art in Public Places was recognized by Americans for the Arts in 2005 as one of the 37 Most Innovative Approaches to Public Art, for its significant public art initiatives in a small community.

 

In addition, Brooks Resources has been a leader in cultivating funds for public art installations in Bend. Notable initiatives include ArtMatch—a matching gift program to raise $1 million to purchase and install art, and significant contributions to local social service and arts organizations, such as Arts Central, the Tower Theatre, and the Bowman Museum.

 

Through its active partnerships with the arts, Brooks Resources recognizes its major stakeholders—the Bend community. Art in Public Places is a driving force of economic growth that encourages tourism, job creation and urban renewal. Brooks Resources’ collaborative efforts confirm that partnering with the arts is a valuable investment in the community in which its clients and employees live and work.

 

For more information on 2014 BCA 10 honoree Brooks Resources Corporation, visit Brooks-Resources.com.

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Shaking Up Employee Volunteer Programs

Posted by Maura Koehler-Hanlon
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The following is an article originally posted on VolunteerMatch, written by vice president of Client Services Maura Koehler-Hanlon, in which she describes how she recently challenged the existing system of employee volunteer programs, and argued for an overhaul of the field. Visit VolunteerMatch for more articles about volunteering and corporate social responsibility.

 

Earlier this month I hit the road with Vicky Hush, VolunteerMatch’s VP of Engagement & Strategic Partnerships. We headed up to Portland to present to Hands On Greater Portland’s Corporate Volunteer Council to share our expertise with employee volunteer managers about how to keep your employee volunteer program (EVP) fresh and exciting. Leading up to the presentation, we had a tough internal conversation which amounted to this: how controversial did we want to be? What would happen if we just came out and said that we think EVPs should be doing more? We decided to go for it – those Portlanders are a tough bunch with all that fresh air! And it worked: when we asked the room of EVP managers “how many of you feel like your employee volunteer program is as strong as it can be?” we (not surprisingly) didn’t see a single hand.

 

Through the conversation, we reviewed a few frameworks that can help companies “reinvent the road,” including:

 

  • Go back and review the core reasons that your company has a volunteer program – other than for the community benefit. And be honest.
  • Look at the overlap between your employees’ passions, your corporate strategy and your communities’ needs. Think about the shared value between your company’s strategy and society’s needs.
  • Constantly adapt, assess and evolve using the program change model.
     

Towards the end of the presentation, we shifted to brainstorming specific program components. There were some great insights!

 

Communications Trends

 

We discussed communications, and two trends became clear:
 

  1. People are overstimulated with messages, so we have to think about creative, new ways to reach them, particularly focused on social, inclusive, lively, fashionable, and visual methods.
  2. We have to go back to basics. Sometimes the least efficient mode of communication is the most effective (meaning, sometimes you have to go back to face-to-face interactions).
     

Measurement Challenges

 

One area where most companies struggle is measurement. Everyone in the room agreed that the silver bullet is tracking impact, but we have not yet developed a way to successfully track this. By the end of the discussion, the trending idea was that corporations need to invest in nonprofit infrastructure to build open-source tools to track metrics that are mutually beneficial for corporations and nonprofits. VolunteerMatch loves this idea – who is up for helping us achieve this project?

 

Incentives that Work

 

Finally, we brainstormed on creative incentives. While we all agreed that awards, competition, dollars for doers and VTO are effective, there was one major idea that emerged: incentives need to be carefully implemented to feel authentic. The culture of philanthropy is not something that can be forced or created through incentives, as the true motivation to volunteer is inherently intrinsic. You want to create incentives that match this ethos: Make it easy and rewarding for the volunteers who already engage, and don’t try to force employees to volunteer who aren’t naturally drawn to it. In an ideal world, what if you could flip incentives on their heads, and instead recruit and hire employees based on their community-minded drive? So now our challenge for you – how can you innovate on your EVP to increase your impact? Think about how your program is unique, and what value your employees can bring to the community. Think critically about why you do what you do, and start to challenge your company to do more.

 

*This article was posted on ARTSblog.

 

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Making the Arts in Rural Oregon Their Business

Posted by Kathleen Chaves
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In 2002, jobs were scarce in rural, isolated Baker City, OR, population 10,000. My husband and I decided to dedicate ourselves to growing our 20-year-old company, Chaves Consulting, Inc. from providing two jobs to creating 100 with a complete package of benefits.

At about the same time, another vision was being created by the Crossroads Arts board to have someone raise the almost two million dollars it would take to renovate Baker City’s historic 1909 Carnegie Library building to become their new home after spending much of its history without a permanent one. The Crossroads board asked if I would be the grant writer to raise the funding and manage the renovation project.

My husband, Richard, and my motivation for leading the project was based on the vision of how the arts could grow and make a huge difference in the lives of Baker’s children and families, as it had altered mine. I strongly believed that this project would provide children an avenue to express themselves and uplift them as it had done for me during my teenage years when I felt very disconnected and lost.

We believed that the arts could give children a voice who otherwise felt lonely and isolated. The arts saved my life and made me feel a part of something. I believed it could do the same in Baker. In addition, the renovated Carnegie building would give hundreds of adult Eastern Oregon artists an incredible space to share their gift.

In 2008, six years and $1.8 million later, Chaves Consulting and the Crossroads Arts board had realized their vision of creating a fully restored historic gem to be Crossroads Art Center’s permanent home. Crossroads Carnegie Art Center is a community art center that provides sales gallery, pottery studio, dance studio, classrooms, and a theater space in which people of all ages can show their art and receive ongoing art education.

Crossroads also hosts community events, lectures, programs, and traveling art shows. It is available for businesses to conduct retreats and meetings, and for weddings, graduation receptions…anything the community could envision.

Chaves Consulting, Inc.’s 30 employees continue to support Crossroads with sponsorships, donations, and the most valuable commodity—our time. Chaves creates and supports an employee environment that encourages participation in the arts. My husband and I do simple things like purchasing artist Terri Axness’ cards that depict Baker City’s beauty to send as business thank you notes.

Mary Tomlinson, our marketing director, and I lead a mentoring team for Crossroads Executive Director Ginger Savage. Chaves team members have folded newsletters, made displays for fundraising efforts, fixed the executive director’s broken computer (numerous times), and generally are there for Crossroads for projects large or small.

My husband, Richard, is currently advising Ginger on the selection of new membership software for the organization.

Ginger appreciates the help, saying, “For me as a nonprofit director, to be able to ask questions or get help at no charge from a business like Chaves is amazing! I get professional advice and it takes their amazing staff, in most cases, minutes to answer my questions. Chaves makes it a priority to help the arts!”

Chaves Consulting, Inc. received a 2012 BCA10 Award from the Americans for the Arts for leadership in the Carnegie restoration project and their long-term support of Crossroads and the arts in rural, geographically remote, high-poverty Eastern Oregon.

When thanking Americans for the Arts for the award, Richard said, “If every company did their part in their communities to support children and the arts, it would become the norm instead of the exception.”

This year Crossroads hosted “Persistence in Clay: Contemporary Ceramics in Montana” a national traveling exhibition of ceramics from the Missoula Art Museum. It was the organization’s first national traveling exhibition and they were able to leverage over $60,000 in grant funds to promote the show and make permanent improvements to the center.

In 2013, Crossroads Carnegie Art Center celebrates its 50th Anniversary as the oldest continuously operating community arts center in the state of Oregon.

Crossroads envisions celebrating by starting an artist relocation program and continuing to attract artists and traveling shows that will enrich the lives of children and adults in Eastern Oregon.
 

*This article was originally posted on ARTSblog.

In 2002, jobs were scarce in rural, isolated Baker City, OR, population 10,000. My husband and I decided to dedicate ourselves to growing our 20-year-old company, Chaves Consulting, Inc. from providing two jobs to creating 100 with a complete package of benefits.

At about the same time, another vision was being created by the Crossroads Arts board to have someone raise the almost two million dollars it would take to renovate Baker City’s historic 1909 Carnegie Library building to become their new home after spending much of its history without a permanent one. The Crossroads board asked if I would be the grant writer to raise the funding and manage the renovation project.

My husband, Richard, and my motivation for leading the project was based on the vision of how the arts could grow and make a huge difference in the lives of Baker’s children and families, as it had altered mine. I strongly believed that this project would provide children an avenue to express themselves and uplift them as it had done for me during my teenage years when I felt very disconnected and lost.

We believed that the arts could give children a voice who otherwise felt lonely and isolated. The arts saved my life and made me feel a part of something. I believed it could do the same in Baker. In addition, the renovated Carnegie building would give hundreds of adult Eastern Oregon artists an incredible space to share their gift.

In 2008, six years and $1.8 million later, Chaves Consulting and the Crossroads Arts board had realized their vision of creating a fully restored historic gem to be Crossroads Art Center’s permanent home. Crossroads Carnegie Art Center is a community art center that provides sales gallery, pottery studio, dance studio, classrooms, and a theater space in which people of all ages can show their art and receive ongoing art education.

Crossroads also hosts community events, lectures, programs, and traveling art shows. It is available for businesses to conduct retreats and meetings, and for weddings, graduation receptions…anything the community could envision.

Chaves Consulting, Inc.’s 30 employees continue to support Crossroads with sponsorships, donations, and the most valuable commodity—our time. Chaves creates and supports an employee environment that encourages participation in the arts. My husband and I do simple things like purchasing artist Terri Axness’ cards that depict Baker City’s beauty to send as business thank you notes.

Mary Tomlinson, our marketing director, and I lead a mentoring team for Crossroads Executive Director Ginger Savage. Chaves team members have folded newsletters, made displays for fundraising efforts, fixed the executive director’s broken computer (numerous times), and generally are there for Crossroads for projects large or small.

My husband, Richard, is currently advising Ginger on the selection of new membership software for the organization.

Ginger appreciates the help, saying, “For me as a nonprofit director, to be able to ask questions or get help at no charge from a business like Chaves is amazing! I get professional advice and it takes their amazing staff, in most cases, minutes to answer my questions. Chaves makes it a priority to help the arts!”

Chaves Consulting, Inc. received a 2012 BCA10 Award from the Americans for the Arts for leadership in the Carnegie restoration project and their long-term support of Crossroads and the arts in rural, geographically remote, high-poverty Eastern Oregon.

When thanking Americans for the Arts for the award, Richard said, “If every company did their part in their communities to support children and the arts, it would become the norm instead of the exception.”

This year Crossroads hosted “Persistence in Clay: Contemporary Ceramics in Montana” a national traveling exhibition of ceramics from the Missoula Art Museum. It was the organization’s first national traveling exhibition and they were able to leverage over $60,000 in grant funds to promote the show and make permanent improvements to the center.

In 2013, Crossroads Carnegie Art Center celebrates its 50th Anniversary as the oldest continuously operating community arts center in the state of Oregon.

Crossroads envisions celebrating by starting an artist relocation program and continuing to attract artists and traveling shows that will enrich the lives of children and adults in Eastern Oregon.

- See more at: http://blog.artsusa.org/2013/02/28/making-the-arts-in-rural-oregon-their-business-from-the-partnership-movement/#more-18984

In 2002, jobs were scarce in rural, isolated Baker City, OR, population 10,000. My husband and I decided to dedicate ourselves to growing our 20-year-old company, Chaves Consulting, Inc. from providing two jobs to creating 100 with a complete package of benefits.

At about the same time, another vision was being created by the Crossroads Arts board to have someone raise the almost two million dollars it would take to renovate Baker City’s historic 1909 Carnegie Library building to become their new home after spending much of its history without a permanent one. The Crossroads board asked if I would be the grant writer to raise the funding and manage the renovation project.

My husband, Richard, and my motivation for leading the project was based on the vision of how the arts could grow and make a huge difference in the lives of Baker’s children and families, as it had altered mine. I strongly believed that this project would provide children an avenue to express themselves and uplift them as it had done for me during my teenage years when I felt very disconnected and lost.

We believed that the arts could give children a voice who otherwise felt lonely and isolated. The arts saved my life and made me feel a part of something. I believed it could do the same in Baker. In addition, the renovated Carnegie building would give hundreds of adult Eastern Oregon artists an incredible space to share their gift.

In 2008, six years and $1.8 million later, Chaves Consulting and the Crossroads Arts board had realized their vision of creating a fully restored historic gem to be Crossroads Art Center’s permanent home. Crossroads Carnegie Art Center is a community art center that provides sales gallery, pottery studio, dance studio, classrooms, and a theater space in which people of all ages can show their art and receive ongoing art education.

Crossroads also hosts community events, lectures, programs, and traveling art shows. It is available for businesses to conduct retreats and meetings, and for weddings, graduation receptions…anything the community could envision.

Chaves Consulting, Inc.’s 30 employees continue to support Crossroads with sponsorships, donations, and the most valuable commodity—our time. Chaves creates and supports an employee environment that encourages participation in the arts. My husband and I do simple things like purchasing artist Terri Axness’ cards that depict Baker City’s beauty to send as business thank you notes.

Mary Tomlinson, our marketing director, and I lead a mentoring team for Crossroads Executive Director Ginger Savage. Chaves team members have folded newsletters, made displays for fundraising efforts, fixed the executive director’s broken computer (numerous times), and generally are there for Crossroads for projects large or small.

My husband, Richard, is currently advising Ginger on the selection of new membership software for the organization.

Ginger appreciates the help, saying, “For me as a nonprofit director, to be able to ask questions or get help at no charge from a business like Chaves is amazing! I get professional advice and it takes their amazing staff, in most cases, minutes to answer my questions. Chaves makes it a priority to help the arts!”

Chaves Consulting, Inc. received a 2012 BCA10 Award from the Americans for the Arts for leadership in the Carnegie restoration project and their long-term support of Crossroads and the arts in rural, geographically remote, high-poverty Eastern Oregon.

When thanking Americans for the Arts for the award, Richard said, “If every company did their part in their communities to support children and the arts, it would become the norm instead of the exception.”

This year Crossroads hosted “Persistence in Clay: Contemporary Ceramics in Montana” a national traveling exhibition of ceramics from the Missoula Art Museum. It was the organization’s first national traveling exhibition and they were able to leverage over $60,000 in grant funds to promote the show and make permanent improvements to the center.

In 2013, Crossroads Carnegie Art Center celebrates its 50th Anniversary as the oldest continuously operating community arts center in the state of Oregon.

Crossroads envisions celebrating by starting an artist relocation program and continuing to attract artists and traveling shows that will enrich the lives of children and adults in Eastern Oregon.

- See more at: http://blog.artsusa.org/2013/02/28/making-the-arts-in-rural-oregon-their-business-from-the-partnership-movement/#more-18984

In 2002, jobs were scarce in rural, isolated Baker City, OR, population 10,000. My husband and I decided to dedicate ourselves to growing our 20-year-old company, Chaves Consulting, Inc. from providing two jobs to creating 100 with a complete package of benefits.

At about the same time, another vision was being created by the Crossroads Arts board to have someone raise the almost two million dollars it would take to renovate Baker City’s historic 1909 Carnegie Library building to become their new home after spending much of its history without a permanent one. The Crossroads board asked if I would be the grant writer to raise the funding and manage the renovation project.

My husband, Richard, and my motivation for leading the project was based on the vision of how the arts could grow and make a huge difference in the lives of Baker’s children and families, as it had altered mine. I strongly believed that this project would provide children an avenue to express themselves and uplift them as it had done for me during my teenage years when I felt very disconnected and lost.

We believed that the arts could give children a voice who otherwise felt lonely and isolated. The arts saved my life and made me feel a part of something. I believed it could do the same in Baker. In addition, the renovated Carnegie building would give hundreds of adult Eastern Oregon artists an incredible space to share their gift.

In 2008, six years and $1.8 million later, Chaves Consulting and the Crossroads Arts board had realized their vision of creating a fully restored historic gem to be Crossroads Art Center’s permanent home. Crossroads Carnegie Art Center is a community art center that provides sales gallery, pottery studio, dance studio, classrooms, and a theater space in which people of all ages can show their art and receive ongoing art education.

Crossroads also hosts community events, lectures, programs, and traveling art shows. It is available for businesses to conduct retreats and meetings, and for weddings, graduation receptions…anything the community could envision.

Chaves Consulting, Inc.’s 30 employees continue to support Crossroads with sponsorships, donations, and the most valuable commodity—our time. Chaves creates and supports an employee environment that encourages participation in the arts. My husband and I do simple things like purchasing artist Terri Axness’ cards that depict Baker City’s beauty to send as business thank you notes.

Mary Tomlinson, our marketing director, and I lead a mentoring team for Crossroads Executive Director Ginger Savage. Chaves team members have folded newsletters, made displays for fundraising efforts, fixed the executive director’s broken computer (numerous times), and generally are there for Crossroads for projects large or small.

My husband, Richard, is currently advising Ginger on the selection of new membership software for the organization.

Ginger appreciates the help, saying, “For me as a nonprofit director, to be able to ask questions or get help at no charge from a business like Chaves is amazing! I get professional advice and it takes their amazing staff, in most cases, minutes to answer my questions. Chaves makes it a priority to help the arts!”

Chaves Consulting, Inc. received a 2012 BCA10 Award from the Americans for the Arts for leadership in the Carnegie restoration project and their long-term support of Crossroads and the arts in rural, geographically remote, high-poverty Eastern Oregon.

When thanking Americans for the Arts for the award, Richard said, “If every company did their part in their communities to support children and the arts, it would become the norm instead of the exception.”

This year Crossroads hosted “Persistence in Clay: Contemporary Ceramics in Montana” a national traveling exhibition of ceramics from the Missoula Art Museum. It was the organization’s first national traveling exhibition and they were able to leverage over $60,000 in grant funds to promote the show and make permanent improvements to the center.

In 2013, Crossroads Carnegie Art Center celebrates its 50th Anniversary as the oldest continuously operating community arts center in the state of Oregon.

Crossroads envisions celebrating by starting an artist relocation program and continuing to attract artists and traveling shows that will enrich the lives of children and adults in Eastern Oregon.

- See more at: http://blog.artsusa.org/2013/02/28/making-the-arts-in-rural-oregon-their-business-from-the-partnership-movement/#more-18984

In 2002, jobs were scarce in rural, isolated Baker City, OR, population 10,000. My husband and I decided to dedicate ourselves to growing our 20-year-old company, Chaves Consulting, Inc. from providing two jobs to creating 100 with a complete package of benefits.

At about the same time, another vision was being created by the Crossroads Arts board to have someone raise the almost two million dollars it would take to renovate Baker City’s historic 1909 Carnegie Library building to become their new home after spending much of its history without a permanent one. The Crossroads board asked if I would be the grant writer to raise the funding and manage the renovation project.

My husband, Richard, and my motivation for leading the project was based on the vision of how the arts could grow and make a huge difference in the lives of Baker’s children and families, as it had altered mine. I strongly believed that this project would provide children an avenue to express themselves and uplift them as it had done for me during my teenage years when I felt very disconnected and lost.

We believed that the arts could give children a voice who otherwise felt lonely and isolated. The arts saved my life and made me feel a part of something. I believed it could do the same in Baker. In addition, the renovated Carnegie building would give hundreds of adult Eastern Oregon artists an incredible space to share their gift.

In 2008, six years and $1.8 million later, Chaves Consulting and the Crossroads Arts board had realized their vision of creating a fully restored historic gem to be Crossroads Art Center’s permanent home. Crossroads Carnegie Art Center is a community art center that provides sales gallery, pottery studio, dance studio, classrooms, and a theater space in which people of all ages can show their art and receive ongoing art education.

Crossroads also hosts community events, lectures, programs, and traveling art shows. It is available for businesses to conduct retreats and meetings, and for weddings, graduation receptions…anything the community could envision.

Chaves Consulting, Inc.’s 30 employees continue to support Crossroads with sponsorships, donations, and the most valuable commodity—our time. Chaves creates and supports an employee environment that encourages participation in the arts. My husband and I do simple things like purchasing artist Terri Axness’ cards that depict Baker City’s beauty to send as business thank you notes.

Mary Tomlinson, our marketing director, and I lead a mentoring team for Crossroads Executive Director Ginger Savage. Chaves team members have folded newsletters, made displays for fundraising efforts, fixed the executive director’s broken computer (numerous times), and generally are there for Crossroads for projects large or small.

My husband, Richard, is currently advising Ginger on the selection of new membership software for the organization.

Ginger appreciates the help, saying, “For me as a nonprofit director, to be able to ask questions or get help at no charge from a business like Chaves is amazing! I get professional advice and it takes their amazing staff, in most cases, minutes to answer my questions. Chaves makes it a priority to help the arts!”

Chaves Consulting, Inc. received a 2012 BCA10 Award from the Americans for the Arts for leadership in the Carnegie restoration project and their long-term support of Crossroads and the arts in rural, geographically remote, high-poverty Eastern Oregon.

When thanking Americans for the Arts for the award, Richard said, “If every company did their part in their communities to support children and the arts, it would become the norm instead of the exception.”

This year Crossroads hosted “Persistence in Clay: Contemporary Ceramics in Montana” a national traveling exhibition of ceramics from the Missoula Art Museum. It was the organization’s first national traveling exhibition and they were able to leverage over $60,000 in grant funds to promote the show and make permanent improvements to the center.

In 2013, Crossroads Carnegie Art Center celebrates its 50th Anniversary as the oldest continuously operating community arts center in the state of Oregon.

Crossroads envisions celebrating by starting an artist relocation program and continuing to attract artists and traveling shows that will enrich the lives of children and adults in Eastern Oregon.

- See more at: http://blog.artsusa.org/2013/02/28/making-the-arts-in-rural-oregon-their-business-from-the-partnership-movement/#more-18984

In 2002, jobs were scarce in rural, isolated Baker City, OR, population 10,000. My husband and I decided to dedicate ourselves to growing our 20-year-old company, Chaves Consulting, Inc. from providing two jobs to creating 100 with a complete package of benefits.

At about the same time, another vision was being created by the Crossroads Arts board to have someone raise the almost two million dollars it would take to renovate Baker City’s historic 1909 Carnegie Library building to become their new home after spending much of its history without a permanent one. The Crossroads board asked if I would be the grant writer to raise the funding and manage the renovation project.

My husband, Richard, and my motivation for leading the project was based on the vision of how the arts could grow and make a huge difference in the lives of Baker’s children and families, as it had altered mine. I strongly believed that this project would provide children an avenue to express themselves and uplift them as it had done for me during my teenage years when I felt very disconnected and lost.

We believed that the arts could give children a voice who otherwise felt lonely and isolated. The arts saved my life and made me feel a part of something. I believed it could do the same in Baker. In addition, the renovated Carnegie building would give hundreds of adult Eastern Oregon artists an incredible space to share their gift.

In 2008, six years and $1.8 million later, Chaves Consulting and the Crossroads Arts board had realized their vision of creating a fully restored historic gem to be Crossroads Art Center’s permanent home. Crossroads Carnegie Art Center is a community art center that provides sales gallery, pottery studio, dance studio, classrooms, and a theater space in which people of all ages can show their art and receive ongoing art education.

Crossroads also hosts community events, lectures, programs, and traveling art shows. It is available for businesses to conduct retreats and meetings, and for weddings, graduation receptions…anything the community could envision.

Chaves Consulting, Inc.’s 30 employees continue to support Crossroads with sponsorships, donations, and the most valuable commodity—our time. Chaves creates and supports an employee environment that encourages participation in the arts. My husband and I do simple things like purchasing artist Terri Axness’ cards that depict Baker City’s beauty to send as business thank you notes.

Mary Tomlinson, our marketing director, and I lead a mentoring team for Crossroads Executive Director Ginger Savage. Chaves team members have folded newsletters, made displays for fundraising efforts, fixed the executive director’s broken computer (numerous times), and generally are there for Crossroads for projects large or small.

My husband, Richard, is currently advising Ginger on the selection of new membership software for the organization.

Ginger appreciates the help, saying, “For me as a nonprofit director, to be able to ask questions or get help at no charge from a business like Chaves is amazing! I get professional advice and it takes their amazing staff, in most cases, minutes to answer my questions. Chaves makes it a priority to help the arts!”

Chaves Consulting, Inc. received a 2012 BCA10 Award from the Americans for the Arts for leadership in the Carnegie restoration project and their long-term support of Crossroads and the arts in rural, geographically remote, high-poverty Eastern Oregon.

When thanking Americans for the Arts for the award, Richard said, “If every company did their part in their communities to support children and the arts, it would become the norm instead of the exception.”

This year Crossroads hosted “Persistence in Clay: Contemporary Ceramics in Montana” a national traveling exhibition of ceramics from the Missoula Art Museum. It was the organization’s first national traveling exhibition and they were able to leverage over $60,000 in grant funds to promote the show and make permanent improvements to the center.

In 2013, Crossroads Carnegie Art Center celebrates its 50th Anniversary as the oldest continuously operating community arts center in the state of Oregon.

Crossroads envisions celebrating by starting an artist relocation program and continuing to attract artists and traveling shows that will enrich the lives of children and adults in Eastern Oregon.

- See more at: http://blog.artsusa.org/2013/02/28/making-the-arts-in-rural-oregon-their-business-from-the-partnership-movement/#more-18984

In 2002, jobs were scarce in rural, isolated Baker City, OR, population 10,000. My husband and I decided to dedicate ourselves to growing our 20-year-old company, Chaves Consulting, Inc. from providing two jobs to creating 100 with a complete package of benefits.

At about the same time, another vision was being created by the Crossroads Arts board to have someone raise the almost two million dollars it would take to renovate Baker City’s historic 1909 Carnegie Library building to become their new home after spending much of its history without a permanent one. The Crossroads board asked if I would be the grant writer to raise the funding and manage the renovation project.

My husband, Richard, and my motivation for leading the project was based on the vision of how the arts could grow and make a huge difference in the lives of Baker’s children and families, as it had altered mine. I strongly believed that this project would provide children an avenue to express themselves and uplift them as it had done for me during my teenage years when I felt very disconnected and lost.

We believed that the arts could give children a voice who otherwise felt lonely and isolated. The arts saved my life and made me feel a part of something. I believed it could do the same in Baker. In addition, the renovated Carnegie building would give hundreds of adult Eastern Oregon artists an incredible space to share their gift.

In 2008, six years and $1.8 million later, Chaves Consulting and the Crossroads Arts board had realized their vision of creating a fully restored historic gem to be Crossroads Art Center’s permanent home. Crossroads Carnegie Art Center is a community art center that provides sales gallery, pottery studio, dance studio, classrooms, and a theater space in which people of all ages can show their art and receive ongoing art education.

Crossroads also hosts community events, lectures, programs, and traveling art shows. It is available for businesses to conduct retreats and meetings, and for weddings, graduation receptions…anything the community could envision.

Chaves Consulting, Inc.’s 30 employees continue to support Crossroads with sponsorships, donations, and the most valuable commodity—our time. Chaves creates and supports an employee environment that encourages participation in the arts. My husband and I do simple things like purchasing artist Terri Axness’ cards that depict Baker City’s beauty to send as business thank you notes.

Mary Tomlinson, our marketing director, and I lead a mentoring team for Crossroads Executive Director Ginger Savage. Chaves team members have folded newsletters, made displays for fundraising efforts, fixed the executive director’s broken computer (numerous times), and generally are there for Crossroads for projects large or small.

My husband, Richard, is currently advising Ginger on the selection of new membership software for the organization.

Ginger appreciates the help, saying, “For me as a nonprofit director, to be able to ask questions or get help at no charge from a business like Chaves is amazing! I get professional advice and it takes their amazing staff, in most cases, minutes to answer my questions. Chaves makes it a priority to help the arts!”

Chaves Consulting, Inc. received a 2012 BCA10 Award from the Americans for the Arts for leadership in the Carnegie restoration project and their long-term support of Crossroads and the arts in rural, geographically remote, high-poverty Eastern Oregon.

When thanking Americans for the Arts for the award, Richard said, “If every company did their part in their communities to support children and the arts, it would become the norm instead of the exception.”

This year Crossroads hosted “Persistence in Clay: Contemporary Ceramics in Montana” a national traveling exhibition of ceramics from the Missoula Art Museum. It was the organization’s first national traveling exhibition and they were able to leverage over $60,000 in grant funds to promote the show and make permanent improvements to the center.

In 2013, Crossroads Carnegie Art Center celebrates its 50th Anniversary as the oldest continuously operating community arts center in the state of Oregon.

Crossroads envisions celebrating by starting an artist relocation program and continuing to attract artists and traveling shows that will enrich the lives of children and adults in Eastern Oregon.

- See more at: http://blog.artsusa.org/2013/02/28/making-the-arts-in-rural-oregon-their-business-from-the-partnership-movement/#more-18984

In 2002, jobs were scarce in rural, isolated Baker City, OR, population 10,000. My husband and I decided to dedicate ourselves to growing our 20-year-old company, Chaves Consulting, Inc. from providing two jobs to creating 100 with a complete package of benefits.

At about the same time, another vision was being created by the Crossroads Arts board to have someone raise the almost two million dollars it would take to renovate Baker City’s historic 1909 Carnegie Library building to become their new home after spending much of its history without a permanent one. The Crossroads board asked if I would be the grant writer to raise the funding and manage the renovation project.

My husband, Richard, and my motivation for leading the project was based on the vision of how the arts could grow and make a huge difference in the lives of Baker’s children and families, as it had altered mine. I strongly believed that this project would provide children an avenue to express themselves and uplift them as it had done for me during my teenage years when I felt very disconnected and lost.

We believed that the arts could give children a voice who otherwise felt lonely and isolated. The arts saved my life and made me feel a part of something. I believed it could do the same in Baker. In addition, the renovated Carnegie building would give hundreds of adult Eastern Oregon artists an incredible space to share their gift.

In 2008, six years and $1.8 million later, Chaves Consulting and the Crossroads Arts board had realized their vision of creating a fully restored historic gem to be Crossroads Art Center’s permanent home. Crossroads Carnegie Art Center is a community art center that provides sales gallery, pottery studio, dance studio, classrooms, and a theater space in which people of all ages can show their art and receive ongoing art education.

Crossroads also hosts community events, lectures, programs, and traveling art shows. It is available for businesses to conduct retreats and meetings, and for weddings, graduation receptions…anything the community could envision.

Chaves Consulting, Inc.’s 30 employees continue to support Crossroads with sponsorships, donations, and the most valuable commodity—our time. Chaves creates and supports an employee environment that encourages participation in the arts. My husband and I do simple things like purchasing artist Terri Axness’ cards that depict Baker City’s beauty to send as business thank you notes.

Mary Tomlinson, our marketing director, and I lead a mentoring team for Crossroads Executive Director Ginger Savage. Chaves team members have folded newsletters, made displays for fundraising efforts, fixed the executive director’s broken computer (numerous times), and generally are there for Crossroads for projects large or small.

My husband, Richard, is currently advising Ginger on the selection of new membership software for the organization.

Ginger appreciates the help, saying, “For me as a nonprofit director, to be able to ask questions or get help at no charge from a business like Chaves is amazing! I get professional advice and it takes their amazing staff, in most cases, minutes to answer my questions. Chaves makes it a priority to help the arts!”

Chaves Consulting, Inc. received a 2012 BCA10 Award from the Americans for the Arts for leadership in the Carnegie restoration project and their long-term support of Crossroads and the arts in rural, geographically remote, high-poverty Eastern Oregon.

When thanking Americans for the Arts for the award, Richard said, “If every company did their part in their communities to support children and the arts, it would become the norm instead of the exception.”

This year Crossroads hosted “Persistence in Clay: Contemporary Ceramics in Montana” a national traveling exhibition of ceramics from the Missoula Art Museum. It was the organization’s first national traveling exhibition and they were able to leverage over $60,000 in grant funds to promote the show and make permanent improvements to the center.

In 2013, Crossroads Carnegie Art Center celebrates its 50th Anniversary as the oldest continuously operating community arts center in the state of Oregon.

Crossroads envisions celebrating by starting an artist relocation program and continuing to attract artists and traveling shows that will enrich the lives of children and adults in Eastern Oregon.

- See more at: http://blog.artsusa.org/2013/02/28/making-the-arts-in-rural-oregon-their-business-from-the-partnership-movement/#more-18984
Related

Incorporating the Arts to Bring Success and Innovation

Posted by Emily Peck
0 Comments

In a recent article in the Oregonian about Portland's arts tax, Jeff Harvey, CEO, Burgerville, talked about what the arts mean to his business:

 

Here is an excerpt from the article published on September 22. Read the full article here and find out what the arts mean to Wieden + Kennedy, Provenance Hotels and others.


On a recent Thursday evening, folks walking into the Hawthorne Burgerville on their way home from work would have sensed the walls pulsing. New York Rifles, a Portland punk/folk band, was thrashing it out in the middle of the dining area. As customers ordered burgers and fries at the counter, lead singer Scott Young, in ripped jeans and shoulder-length hair, howled into the microphone while bandmates thrashed on drums and bass.

 

But who was the older guy playing guitar with them? Patrons probably didn't know it, but the man in dress shirt and slacks was Jeff Harvey, the CEO of Burgerville.

Harvey is a guitarist from way back and likes to sit in with bands when he can, but that's not the only reason he was playing along. Music is a creative expression, and creative vitality is central to his business philosophy, he said.

"Innovation is life and death in this business," he said. "We have tons of competition, so it's important to differentiate ourselves."

Harvey uses innovation in scheduling work shifts, marketing, engaging communities, raising money for local causes and in seasonal displays, he said. For example, diners at the new Tigard Burgerville can tweet and post photos to a live video screen inside the restaurant.

Live music in his restaurants is another example of creativity, he said.

Five years ago, Burgerville experimented with music at its Hawthorne restaurant. Bands performed and streamed their music online, and the idea expanded to five other restaurants. Burgerville recently released its second album of local bands (including the Dandy Warhols, Pink Martini, Y La Bamba), to benefit the Portland Police Bureau's Sunshine Division, which gives emergency food and clothing to families in need.

Local music now constitutes 40 percent of the piped-in music at each of the chain's 29 restaurants, Harvey said.

Music is his creative expression, but until 10 years ago, he had an on-and-off relationship with it. "Every time I put the guitar away, my career became harder. I faced bigger challenges, I was more worn out, I would struggle. When I brought it back, I thought, 'wow, I feel so much more capable.' My confidence in my ability to adapt rose. I love improvisation. That's why I love jazz. I'm in a business situation and music will come into my thoughts. Words, a phrase -- I'll relate it to a chord progression. I sing it. Creative expression is a sound business practice."
 

Video: Jeff Harvey, who started playing guitar in the fifth grade, believes creativity is important to business innovation. Burgerville frequently hosts live, local music. Harvey, (screen right, in white shirt), plays a song with the New York Rifles in a benefit for the Portland Police Bureau's Sunshine Division. Video courtesy Oregonlive.com.

Related

Brewing Up Great Partnerships in Eugene, Oregon

Posted by Emily Peck
0 Comments

The Arts and Business Alliance of Eugene (ABAE) celebrated great local partnerships at their BRAVA awards breakfast. Watch the video to learn why Ninkasi Brewery partners with local musicians.


 

Check out videos of more great partnerships in Eugene, Oregon and learn more about how these partnerships drive economic development, strengthen the ability of businesses to recruit talented individuals into the workforce and stimulate creativity and innovation throughout the community.

Corporate Culture Goes Cultural

Posted by Jessica Stern
0 Comments
Corporate Culture Goes Cultural

A sample of the pieces created by employees of The Standard. (Photo by Liang Liang)

 

I’m not going to lie, I really don’t know much about visual art. It’s embarrassing as an “arts” administrator because my brother is an accomplished artist, my mother is a wildly creative interior designer, and my father fashions some of the most impressive urban development project management documents around.

 

Now, I could tell you all about Romantic-era composers, and go on about West African beats and argue why their current grooves are an aural history lesson of the slave-trade and post-colonialism, but when it comes to visual art, I just really don’t know a lot.

What I do know is, 1) generally speaking, I like visual art a lot and 2) I love seeing art by people who don’t consider themselves professional artists.

 

Enter reason #17 or so why I love my job: The ongoing charge to recognize businesses that make a special effort to unleash the inner artist in their accountants, actuaries, techies, and administrators.

 

So, naturally I was overjoyed to receive an invite last month to attend the opening of The Standard’s 2nd Annual ARTS (Artists in Residence at The Standard) Show.

 

The Standard, a financial services company, is one of Portland’s largest private employers, with approximately 2,200 individuals working in the state. This 106-year-old Oregon-born company was founded originally as a life insurance company with a goal to “champion the needs of the local community.” That value of being a community champion still rings true and The Standard is continually recognized for its charitable work, in addition to being a great supporter of arts and culture.

 

Always on Business for Culture & the Arts’ (BCA) list of the Top Business Donors to the Arts, The Standard ranked as the #1 Business Donor to the Arts in 2010 in the Portland Metro Area and #2 in the state of Oregon. Last year, in BCA’s cumulative study of 10 years of data, The Standard ranked #6 in the state of Oregon (having contributed over $1.8 million to arts and culture in 10 years).

 

Whether it’s through volunteerism, employee team scavenger hunts or direct giving, in addition to insurance, this company does something exquisitely: they honor their employees.

 

But back to ARTS…I’m familiar with programs that other Business Committees for the Arts run in other cities like On My Own Time (Denver) and art@work (Kansas City), but I hadn’t realized that some companies take it upon themselves to highlight the artistic talents of their staff.

 

I wasn’t able to make last year’s ARTS opening event and so I didn’t have an expectation of what I would encounter in an insurance company’s employee-only art show. Imagine my delight when I got off the elevator and saw that this was not just a room blocked off for some drawings and paintings; The Standard dedicated an entire building floor to showcase the creative fruits of their staff!

 

A sample of the pieces created by employees of The Standard. (Photo by Liang Liang)

Once inside, I had to continually pick my jaw up from the floor. The employees of The Standard are TALENTED! Every medium was represented: painting, pen and ink, stained glass, quilting, beading and jewelry, photography, sculpture, you name it. I was especially delighted to see one of BCA’s Board Members showing off two exquisite oil paintings. I had no idea!

 

And therein lies the beauty of what The Standard has done for the second year in a row for their employees.

 

When you’re not a self-described artist, or you have a day job that maybe you love (maybe not?), often our time to create gets put into another box outside the workplace. That creativity tends to become part of our “other” self; separated from the time we spend in the “real world” doing “grown-up” things. By creating a space to showcase employee art, The Standard has bridged the gap between personal and professional in an inspiring way.

 

It takes our thinking from, “Oh, there’s Joe over there, he’s a claims analyst,” to “There’s Joe over there, he’s an analyst and also makes really interesting mix-media collages. I saw them at the employee art show last year.” We learn to appreciate our colleagues for all of themselves, not just the person we see at a desk for eight hours a day.

 

This experience of showing one’s art in the workplace gives employees an opportunity to open what is normally a very private part of their lives for their colleagues in order to appreciate one another’s talents.

 

It’s been proven that companies who blur that personal/professional line and focus on the whole self and well-being of their employees see greater productivity and less turnover. We also know intrinsically that corporate art collections make for visually stimulating work spaces, which also keep employees happy.

 

At a recent testimony before Portland City Council to refer a public funding measure for arts education and access to the ballot, a gentleman implored City Commissioners to imagine Council Chambers without the paintings and sculptures that enhanced the space. He encouraged them to imagine their difficult jobs without that creative inspiration.

 

This was a poignant moment, and one that I think about when visiting businesses. I realize how much more uplifted I am when I’m surrounded by beautiful or challenging art, even though I don’t know much about technique or the great artists that came before to inform a certain style. I appreciate the companies who provide stimulating surroundings for their employees and think about how much more pleasant a workplace it must be.

 

That The Standard opened its walls to its own employees not only tells me their corporate culture is one that wants to keep people happy, it tells me that they know creativity and appreciation for a colleague’s work will continually boost company spirits, encourage people to know one another a little better, and appreciate the multi-faceted lives we all live.

 

It tells me that by using art as a means for connection, we infuse our daily surroundings with inspiration that can only inform and encourage progress in the daily cycle of business and work.

 

*This was originally posted on ARTSblog.

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More News

Arts Breakfast of Champions: Recognizing Excellence in Portland
Dec 06, 2011 0 Comments
On November 3, Portland-based Business for Culture & the Arts (BCA) celebrated its 25th Anniversary with over 460 arts and business leaders during the annual Arts Breakfast of Champions. Historically an event to recognize the...
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