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eMoney using Art to Connect to New Community

Posted by Danielle Iwata
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eMoney using Art to Connect to New Community

eMoney Advisor, a wealth management solutions provider, recently opened their third location in Providence, RI in 2017. In order to connect with the new employees and the new community, the firm has turned to art.

 

“Since eMoney is fairly new to Providence, it’s been really important for us to connect with the community,” said Tessa Raum, Head of People Experience, at eMoney. “Most of our office is comprised of talented Rhode Islanders who are proud to live, work and give back to their communities. Displaying the incredible work of local artists in our office was an easy way for us to further integrate Providence’s culture within the eMoney environment.”

 

Two weeks ago, the company announced its partnership with the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts (RISCA). RISCA presented works by local artists who were named fellows by their annual grant program. Employeees from eMoney were then given the opportunity to review and vote for their favorite pieces. The top choices now reside in the eMoney office at 100 Westminster Street.

 

If you happen to walk through the office, you may see works by Jodie Goodnough, or Johnny Adimando, Kathy Jodge. “It was great to be included in the process of choosing the art and then see it hung in our office,” said Gary Jutras, a senior software engineer at eMoney. “We all have our favorites, and the variety makes the office really feel like our own space.”

 

RISCA plans to continue involving the employees with the arts with lunch-and-learns with the artists.

 

New release: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20180419006244/en/eMoney-Advisor-Partners-Rhode-Island-State-Council

Photo: BusinessWire

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Shadowplay in the Streets of Austin

Posted by Danielle Iwata
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Shadowplay in the Streets of Austin

 

When the sun went down and the street lights went on, city dwellers and tourists alike had the chance to dance in the shadows of Austin. From the end of February to mid-March, Shadowing Austin popped up in six locations throughout the city. This art installation allowed people to interact with others who had walked the same path. Thanks to infrared cameras and projectors strategically placed around town, shadows suddenly came alive.

 

For this project, the Playable City Austin, an initiative of the Cultural Arts Division in the City of Austin (CAD) reached out to Austin Energy (AE)—a 2016 BCA 10 Honoree— for their knowledge, technology, and support. Austin Energy, the community owned electric utility, was responsible for scouting locations, installing the fixtures, and maintaining them. CAD, AE and artist Jonathan Chomko collaborated throughout  Summer 2017 on installation plans, and Shadowing Austin launched in February 2018.

 

 “Austin values art in public places,” said Allen Small, Austin Energy Distribution Director. “It was great to partner with other city departments and the artists to help get this project up and running. It was fun to watch people interacting with each other and with the installations. This is the type of project that gets people talking to each other again, instead of just looking down at their phones.”

 

This type of collaboration speaks to the initial intent of the project. The artists Chomoko and Matthew Rosier developed this interactive installation (initially for the City of London) to promote community engagement. And it certainly has done so in Austin. CAD reports that during their installation, the Shadowing fixtures had nearly 100,000 interactions.

 

 

Photos courtesy of Austin Energy

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Jacksonville's Public Art Week

Posted by Danielle Iwata
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Jacksonville's Public Art Week

From April 1-7, Public Art Week will be “Building a Better Community” in Jacksonville, Florida. Hosted by the Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville, this event is “an annual, week-long initiative that celebrates Jacksonville’s public art and highlights the benefits that are created when investments are made in art that is accessible by all.”

With over 25 presenters and 25 events, this week is proving to be a strong show of support for the arts.

 

A panel moderated by Emily Peck (Vice President of Private Sector Initiatives, Americans for the Arts) featured Hugh Greene (president and CEO of Baptist Health), Audra Wallace (CEO of the Downtown Investment Authority), Steven Grossman (CEO of the Jacksonville Aviation Authority), and Alicia Somers (financial wellness director for Regions Bank). Each discussed the value of private sector support for the arts and its transformative power.

 

While it might not seem that a hospital, an airport, and a bank would have much in common, all of them use the arts to create vibrant spaces for their staff, patients, and clients. Baptist Hospitals have long displayed artwork at each location, but are currently in talks with representatives from the Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville, the Cummer Museum of Art & Garden, and a sculptor to consult for pieces to be displayed in the newest site. Likewise, the Jacksonville International Airport (JIA) has a permanent collection, two galleries, and eight cases. Grossman also shared that there will also be regular performances by members of the Jacksonville Symphony. Regions Bank works with Fogle Fine Art and Accessories to find works for display in each branch.

 

In addition to support from the private sector, Greene and others encouraged the local government to provide more funding for the arts. After a drastic cut in January, the city has much work ahead to continue and develop the arts. In a city that is struggling with the implications of existing public art (memorials and statues of controversial histories), using art to create vibrant spaces is a step forward.

 

 

Photos by Toni Smailagic of Cre8Jax, courtesy of Jacksonville Cultural Council. 

Interested in measuring business support for the arts in your community?

Posted by Emily Peck
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Interested in measuring business support for the arts in your community?

Since 1969, Americans for the Arts through the Business Committee for the Arts (BCA), has been conducting the National Survey of Business Support for the Arts. Now, conducted annually in partnership with The Conference Board, the survey looks at trends in support for the arts from small, midsize, and large US businesses that participate in corporate philanthropy, employee engagement, volunteer programs, or sponsorships.

 

Americans for the Arts and The Conference Board are now offering local communities the opportunity to participate in this research study to find out more about how their local businesses engage with the arts.

 

Participation starts at $3,500.

 

Email privatesector@artsusa.org for more details on how to participate.

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