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Poets’ Precision Helps Future Physicians

Posted by Stacy Lasner
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Poets’ Precision Helps Future Physicians

In an essay published in July 2015’s Academic Medicine, Dr. Caroline Welbery and Dr. Rebecca McAteer of Georgetown University School of Medicine make a case for incorporating the arts into medical school curriculum. Their research suggests that exposure to the arts can provide valuable new perspectives for physicians-in-training. They have created 8 weeks of curriculum that they call an “arts observation seminar,” which includes instruction in poetry, photography, and descriptive writing.

 

“The literary and visual arts have long-standing and venerable roles in fortifying the lessons of clinical empathy, communication skills, critical thinking, and attention,” the doctors say. They claim that arts-based training can help future physicians keep an open mind, describe their observations with precision, and articulate their ideas effectively.

For example, the doctors suggest that the study of poetic precision “provides an educational bridge to recognizing the importance of detail in the clinical realm, where exactness is critical to providing safe, high-quality medical care. Reviewing examples of literary precision can help students learn how to avoid crude or sloppy descriptions, and how to analyze observations that lack appropriate nuance.”

 

As the Pacific Standard writes, “Wellbery and McAteer argue [that] arts training can help enormously in practicing focused attention, cultivating a habit of close observation, and staying aware of one's own biases. You can't properly diagnose what you don't really see, and when it comes to perceptiveness, there's nothing like a physician with a touch of the poet.”

 

Learn more about the benefits of arts education.
 

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JetBlue’s Book Vending Machine Program Takes Off in D.C.

Posted by Stacy Lasner
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JetBlue’s Book Vending Machine Program Takes Off in D.C.

As we get ready for Arts in Education Week next week, here's a great story about how Jet Blue is encouraging students in underserved communities to engage with literature.

 

In 2011, JetBlue launched Soar with Reading, a cause-marketing program designed to “encourage kids’ imaginations to take flight through reading and get books into the hands of kids that need them most.” This year, the company launched a pilot program designed to provide children in underserved communities with access to books through book vending machines. The program is established in areas that where kids may have access to libraries, but lack the ability to build a home library of their own.


In July 2015, Soar with Reading stocked three vending machines throughout Southeast D.C. with free books for kids. According to the Soar with Reading website, the community will also have the opportunity to opt-in to a SMS campaign where JetBlue will provide age-appropriate reading tips, updates on vending machine book selections and information about “special-guest readers” appearing at the machines. Parents can sign up for text message alerts when the machines are restocked.


“A child can select their age and a topic and then get a book for free. They can come back as often as they like throughout the summer, and in addition to helping families start a library, we hope it shows retailers that there’s demand for access to age appropriate reading material in the community,” said Icema Gibbs, Director of Corporate Social Responsibility for JetBlue Airways to Tayla Burney of the The Kojo Nnamdi Show.


The company chose D.C. to launch the project based on recent research showing that “in the shadow of our nation’s capital, in 2015, there is access to only one-age appropriate book for every 830 children.” JetBlue recently asked the public to vote for the next city to receive book vending machines. Next up...Detroit!


Learn more about the project.

 

Photo fromJetBlue Airlines.

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All Aboard Amtrak's New Writer-in-Residency Program

Posted by Patrick O'Herron
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Amtrak has taken a new interest in the literary artists that so frequently ride its rails. Our nation’s railroad service is now testing a new kind of artist-in-residency program—long roundtrip rides will provide a writing residency on select trains.

 

The idea was dreamt on Twitter by Amtrak fans and customers:

 

(Image courtesy of The Wire.)

 

Amtrak has since taken its residency program for a test run, offering select writers from the Twittersphere a free trip from New York to Chicago, with other trips in the works. The idea is that the train ride will provide a unique environment for creative thought. The goal will be to engage with writers several times per month, though specifics aren’t fully worked out.

 

The company has confirmed plans to keep the writer-in-residency program if not free, then low-cost. The program is still in its infancy, so the application process is yet to be defined. So far, residencies have been set up by Amtrak primarily through social media.

 

Amtrak is proud to pursue this endeavor, which supports writers of all backgrounds. As the company states, it’s about building a mutually beneficial relationship with these artists.

 

Writers are already chomping at the bit for their chance to board Amtrak and get to work the great American novel. Until a formal application process is released, we suggest following and communicating directly with Amtrak on Facebook and Twitter: @Amtrak.

 

UPDATE: Writers can now reigster for the Amtrak residency program at blog.Amtrak.com.

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BCA Executive Board Member celebrates book launch on arts transformation in Southern California

Posted by Patrick O'Herron
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Henry T. Segerstrom, managing partner of C.J. Segerstrom & Sons and a member of Americans for the Arts’ Business Committee for the Arts (BCA) Executive Board, has always been an artistic luminary. A new art book, appropriately named Henry T. Segerstom, has been released by Assouline Publishing, recognizing and celebrating his life and contributions to the arts in Southern California. View the following video from the book's launch.

 

 

Segerstrom was born in 1923 to a family of lima bean farmers with strong business values and a passion for supporting the arts. The Segerstroms owned a sizable amount of land, and because Orange County in the 1940s had no space for public or performance art, they generously donated five acres to build what would eventually come to be known as the Segerstrom Center for the Arts. Today, the Center houses an opera house, a concert hall, and multiple performing arts and education spaces. The Center is surrounded by Arts Plaza, a beautiful outdoor botanical and sculpture garden, commissioned and curated by Segerstrom himself, which includes works from renowned artists such as Isamu Noguchi, Carl Milles, and Aiko Miyawaki.

 

The Henry T. Segerstom art book, beautifully illustrated from start to finish with imagery of the Center, can be purchased at Assouline.com.

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Getting Lit in a Gorgeous Hotel

Posted by Stephanie Dockery
0 Comments

Pen Parentis, a nonprofit literary organization, aims to build a community for writers who have children. Founded by author Milda M. DeVoe, the organization inspires and motivates parent-authors to stay creative after beginning a family. Outreach is conducted through a series of monthly literary salons, hosting notable authors (such as Pulitzer Prize winner Jennifer Egan) and spirited discussions, which have built a loyal audience of published writers, readers, editors, and agents.

When the organization first hosted events in a boutique hotel, the fit wasn’t quite right. That hotel seemed mostly concerned that the organization boosted food and drink sales; meanwhile they continued to market the group as a “book club” rather than using the organization’s preferred term, “salon.” During this first, troubled, partnership, Toni Hinterstoisser, then general manager of the Andaz Wall Street hotel, courted Milda, encouraging her to host Pen Parentis salons at Andaz Wall Street. Toni and Milda frequently ran into one another while attending marketing and networking events held downtown. “When are you going to dump that other hotel chain and come over to us?” he would wheedle. “We love salons. We know what you are and what you need.” As fortune would have it, the first hotel underwent renovations, making it impossible to continue hosting Pen Parentis events. Milda walked straight into the lobby of the Andaz Wall Street, requested the general manager’s attention, and accepted his offer to host Pen Parentis events. With three authors already lined up to present, Toni and Milda formed an alliance based on a handshake agreement.

Andaz Wall Street, a Hyatt brand hotel, saw the sponsorship as a very practical exchange of needs and resources when they first partnered. The hotel aims to “bring the neighborhood to the guests and enrich the guest experience.” Pen Parentis' programs help fulfill that mission, and that's why current general manager Jeffrey Miller continues to support the organization. Pen Parentis attracts a multitude of downtown writers and Wall Street locals, which Andaz loves. Andaz Director of Communications Megan Montenaro believes “brands can go right or wrong when attempting something inorganic to their mission.” Because Pen Parentis’ programs align with Andaz’s brand, the hotel is happy to allocate resources for their events. As a result of this brand harmony, Pen Parentis programs have been able to expand, and in return, Milda has introduced Megan to downtown cultural councils and cultural leaders, allowing Andaz to expand its marketing outreach.

Because Pen Parentis has regularly scheduled monthly salons, the hotel is incentivized to market the events to their guests and “friends of the hotel.” The general manager sends emails to patrons inviting them to Pen Parentis events. To further encourage attendance, Andaz markets Pen Parentis on social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, and Foursquare, and Andaz staff have live-tweeted salon discussions.The casual but intimate atmosphere of both the hotel and the salsons encourages guests to build a relationship with Andaz, enhancing the hotel’s brand.

November’s salon focused on food writing, so Andaz prepared to host 45 Pen Parentis attendees at the Chef’s Table, where the chef cooked select recipes from a featured book, The Cassoulet Saved Our Marriage: True Tales of Food, Family, and How We Learn to Eat, co-edited by Caroline M. Grant, who conducted readings. With food at the centerpiece of the event, Andaz found a perfect way to further feature their business: guests enjoyed the creations of the hotel’s talented chef, and the food enhanced the literary discussion. Megan Montenaro emphasizes, “When you partner with the right people, it’s not hard to do the right events.”

 

In return, Pen Parentis requests that visiting authors stay at the Andaz, as the hotel is much more than just a corporate sponsor of the salons. Milda states, “They are our heroes, and we look forward to continuing our partnership for many years to come.”

Pen Parentis believes the partnership’s best outcome has been adding businesspeople who work on Wall Street to their audience. In part because of Andaz’s upscale location, culturally-savvy locals who are looking to upgrade their date night or post-work drink experience are attracted to the salons. One of these individuals happened to be a young lawyer from a law firm looking for a nonprofit to incubate. As a result of the partnership with Andaz, Pen Parentis developed a relationship with and received pro bono aid from that law firm, Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy LLP.

 

Pen Parentis and Andaz Wall Street are now entering the third year of their partnership, and they plan to continue it. Milda describes the hotel as “the most gracious, enthusiastic hosts imaginable, often providing unexpected treats for salon guests and panelists. Last May’s authors and guests were treated to a four-course dinner at the Chef’s Table. The more enthusiastic our hosts are, the more our audiences surge to the events. They are terrific because they understand and support what we do.”

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Books and Books: A Creative Business That Supports the Arts

Posted by Laura Bruney
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Miami native Mitchell Kaplan sits surrounded by books.  In a time when the number of independent booksellers dropped from over 6,000 to just under 2,000, Kaplan has successfully built an arts and business hybrid that is Books & Books. His establishment is a success story, thanks in part to his relationships with the authors that create the books he sells and to the community.  Thirty-two years ago, Kaplan had a vision to create a place to congregate outside of work and the home.  He wanted an environment where people could meet, relax, share knowledge while celebrating the local literary and cultural community. (Photo credit: Mitchell Kaplan, owner of Books & Books.)

Mitchell Kaplan, owner of Books & Books


In 1983 he helped establish the internationally recognized Miami International Book Fair. He and several other community leaders got the call from Miami Dade College President, Eduardo Padron, to create a community-wide book event that would bring a larger audience to the Wolfson campus. From the start it celebrated writers and readers and has grown into one of the top festivals in the country, a week-long celebration of all things literary. The event includes author readings, showcase events, and children’s activities. As co-founder of the fair, Kaplan has served on the board for over 30 years and helped develop the Florida Center for the Literary Arts. Today, Books & Books hosts over 700 literary events each year in Miami. Kaplan’s team is also actively involved in bringing nearly 400 artists to the Miami International Book Fair. In addition, his stores host unique events with dozens of arts groups and artists each year.

We sat down with Mitchell Kaplan to talk about his unique experiences working as both a small business owner and supporter of our local cultural community.

ABC: What do you think makes a vibrant community and what role do the arts play?

MK:  If you do not have an active arts community, you miss out on the intellectual creativity it brings.  Miami is a great example of the impact arts can have on the community. Twenty five years ago we had very little to offer cultural consumers. The arts bring economic vitality to neighborhoods and help local merchants and businesses that profit for their patrons and participants.

ABC:  Why do you think it is important for business to support the arts?

MK:   Miami is a great city with cultural assets that bring a creative vitality to our community.  Companies should support the arts to maintain that sense of excitement; it draws more visitors to our city and enhances the quality of life for our residents.  As an independent bookstore, my customers vote with their purchases.  For me partnerships with the arts expand the reach of the store and draw in new business. We used to send out a printed newsletter and now do it by email.  Each one features exciting information on authors and features upcoming events and programs. Most of them have a strong cultural component which we cherish and relish.

ABC: What do you value in a partnership with the arts and what role do tangible benefits play?

MK: I look for partnerships that are mutually beneficial and create a platform that introduces new audiences to both partners.  I look at who their target audience is and what does the group bring to the table. Is it a good fit for our company? Our featured partners provide a benefit to their clients or customers who then become aware of Books & Books.  It is a circle, creating a win-win for all. The same with our partnerships with authors; writers are not only artists but are creators of the product that we sell. Our success benefits them and their success benefits us.

ABC: Tell us about one of your great partnerships with the arts.

MK:  There have been so many over the years it is hard to pick just one.  We have worked with theatre groups and hosted local play readings. We have had music groups that performed and educational programs for arts board members and artists. We have also had some unique collaborations with banks, temples, churches and even retail giants. We worked with Macy’s, hosting local cookbook authors to do cooking demos in their  in-store kitchens.  We have the opportunity to get creative with our authors and partners, which makes the relationship successful.

ABC:  How do you personally decide which companies to patronize?

MK: I find I support businesses that support things that I appreciate or causes that are important to me – especially small businesses that give our neighborhoods a unique feel.  When you spend $1 with a local merchant it is like spending $6 with a national retailer, which means more is invested back into the local economy and the community.

ABC:  Anything else you would like to share?

MK:  You need to develop a great team to survive, either in business or the arts.  My team of marketers, buyers, vendors and staff understand the larger mission of Books & Books and help us to thrive. Even in difficult economies or circumstances surrounding yourself and your business with creative energy is always fulfilling and profitable.

(This post, originally posted on ArtsBiz Miami’s Blog, is one in a weekly series highlighting The pARTnership Movement, Americans for the Arts’ campaign to reach business leaders with the message that partnering with the arts can build their competitive advantage.)
 

Miami native Mitchell Kaplan sits surrounded by books.  In a time when the number of independent booksellers dropped from over 6,000 to just under 2,000, Kaplan has successfully built an arts and business hybrid that is Books & Books. His establishment is a success story, thanks in part to his relationships with the authors that create the books he sells and to the community.  Thirty-two years ago, Kaplan had a vision to create a place to congregate outside of work and the home.  He wanted an environment where people could meet, relax, share knowledge while celebrating the local literary and cultural community.

In 1983 he helped establish the internationally recognized Miami International Book Fair. He and several other community leaders got the call from Miami Dade College President, Eduardo Padron, to create a community-wide book event that would bring a larger audience to the Wolfson campus. From the start it celebrated writers and readers and has grown into one of the top festivals in the country, a week-long celebration of all things literary. The event includes author readings, showcase events, and children’s activities. As co-founder of the fair, Kaplan has served on the board for over 30 years and helped develop the Florida Center for the Literary Arts. Today, Books & Books hosts over 700 literary events each year in Miami. Kaplan’s team is also actively involved in bringing nearly 400 artists to the Miami International Book Fair. In addition, his stores host unique events with dozens of arts groups and artists each year.

We sat down with Mitchell Kaplan to talk about his unique experiences working as both a small business owner and supporter of our local cultural community.

ABC: What do you think makes a vibrant community and what role do the arts play?

MK:  If you do not have an active arts community, you miss out on the intellectual creativity it brings.  Miami is a great example of the impact arts can have on the community. Twenty five years ago we had very little to offer cultural consumers. The arts bring economic vitality to neighborhoods and help local merchants and businesses that profit for their patrons and participants.

ABC:  Why do you think it is important for business to support the arts?

MK:   Miami is a great city with cultural assets that bring a creative vitality to our community.  Companies should support the arts to maintain that sense of excitement; it draws more visitors to our city and enhances the quality of life for our residents.  As an independent bookstore, my customers vote with their purchases.  For me partnerships with the arts expand the reach of the store and draw in new business. We used to send out a printed newsletter and now do it by email.  Each one features exciting information on authors and features upcoming events and programs. Most of them have a strong cultural component which we cherish and relish.

ABC: What do you value in a partnership with the arts and what role do tangible benefits play?

MK: I look for partnerships that are mutually beneficial and create a platform that introduces new audiences to both partners.  I look at who their target audience is and what does the group bring to the table. Is it a good fit for our company? Our featured partners provide a benefit to their clients or customers who then become aware of Books & Books.  It is a circle, creating a win-win for all. The same with our partnerships with authors; writers are not only artists but are creators of the product that we sell. Our success benefits them and their success benefits us.

ABC: Tell us about one of your great partnerships with the arts.

MK:  There have been so many over the years it is hard to pick just one.  We have worked with theatre groups and hosted local play readings. We have had music groups that performed and educational programs for arts board members and artists. We have also had some unique collaborations with banks, temples, churches and even retail giants. We worked with Macy’s, hosting local cookbook authors to do cooking demos in their  in-store kitchens.  We have the opportunity to get creative with our authors and partners, which makes the relationship successful.

ABC:  How do you personally decide which companies to patronize?

MK: I find I support businesses that support things that I appreciate or causes that are important to me – especially small businesses that give our neighborhoods a unique feel.  When you spend $1 with a local merchant it is like spending $6 with a national retailer, which means more is invested back into the local economy and the community.

ABC:  Anything else you would like to share?

MK:  You need to develop a great team to survive, either in business or the arts.  My team of marketers, buyers, vendors and staff understand the larger mission of Books & Books and help us to thrive. Even in difficult economies or circumstances surrounding yourself and your business with creative energy is always fulfilling and profitable.

(This post, originally posted on ArtsBiz Miami’s Blog, is one in a weekly series highlighting The pARTnership Movement, Americans for the Arts’ campaign to reach business leaders with the message that partnering with the arts can build their competitive advantage. Visit our website to find out how both businesses and local arts agencies can get involved!)

- See more at: http://blog.artsusa.org/2013/08/08/books-and-books-a-creative-business-that-supports-the-arts-from-the-partnership-movement/#more-21322

Miami native Mitchell Kaplan sits surrounded by books.  In a time when the number of independent booksellers dropped from over 6,000 to just under 2,000, Kaplan has successfully built an arts and business hybrid that is Books & Books. His establishment is a success story, thanks in part to his relationships with the authors that create the books he sells and to the community.  Thirty-two years ago, Kaplan had a vision to create a place to congregate outside of work and the home.  He wanted an environment where people could meet, relax, share knowledge while celebrating the local literary and cultural community.

In 1983 he helped establish the internationally recognized Miami International Book Fair. He and several other community leaders got the call from Miami Dade College President, Eduardo Padron, to create a community-wide book event that would bring a larger audience to the Wolfson campus. From the start it celebrated writers and readers and has grown into one of the top festivals in the country, a week-long celebration of all things literary. The event includes author readings, showcase events, and children’s activities. As co-founder of the fair, Kaplan has served on the board for over 30 years and helped develop the Florida Center for the Literary Arts. Today, Books & Books hosts over 700 literary events each year in Miami. Kaplan’s team is also actively involved in bringing nearly 400 artists to the Miami International Book Fair. In addition, his stores host unique events with dozens of arts groups and artists each year.

We sat down with Mitchell Kaplan to talk about his unique experiences working as both a small business owner and supporter of our local cultural community.

ABC:What do you think makes a vibrant community and what role do the arts play?

MK:  If you do not have an active arts community, you miss out on the intellectual creativity it brings.  Miami is a great example of the impact arts can have on the community. Twenty five years ago we had very little to offer cultural consumers. The arts bring economic vitality to neighborhoods and help local merchants and businesses that profit for their patrons and participants.

ABC:  Why do you think it is important for business to support the arts?

MK:   Miami is a great city with cultural assets that bring a creative vitality to our community.  Companies should support the arts to maintain that sense of excitement; it draws more visitors to our city and enhances the quality of life for our residents.  As an independent bookstore, my customers vote with their purchases.  For me partnerships with the arts expand the reach of the store and draw in new business. We used to send out a printed newsletter and now do it by email.  Each one features exciting information on authors and features upcoming events and programs. Most of them have a strong cultural component which we cherish and relish.

ABC: What do you value in a partnership with the arts and what role do tangible benefits play?

MK: I look for partnerships that are mutually beneficial and create a platform that introduces new audiences to both partners.  I look at who their target audience is and what does the group bring to the table. Is it a good fit for our company? Our featured partners provide a benefit to their clients or customers who then become aware of Books & Books.  It is a circle, creating a win-win for all. The same with our partnerships with authors; writers are not only artists but are creators of the product that we sell. Our success benefits them and their success benefits us.

ABC:Tell us about one of your great partnerships with the arts.

MK:  There have been so many over the years it is hard to pick just one.  We have worked with theatre groups and hosted local play readings. We have had music groups that performed and educational programs for arts board members and artists. We have also had some unique collaborations with banks, temples, churches and even retail giants. We worked with Macy’s, hosting local cookbook authors to do cooking demos in their  in-store kitchens.  We have the opportunity to get creative with our authors and partners, which makes the relationship successful.

ABC:  How do you personally decide which companies to patronize?

MK:I find I support businesses that support things that I appreciate or causes that are important to me – especially small businesses that give our neighborhoods a unique feel.  When you spend $1 with a local merchant it is like spending $6 with a national retailer, which means more is invested back into the local economy and the community.

ABC:  Anything else you would like to share?

MK:  You need to develop a great team to survive, either in business or the arts.  My team of marketers, buyers, vendors and staff understand the larger mission of Books & Books and help us to thrive. Even in difficult economies or circumstances surrounding yourself and your business with creative energy is always fulfilling and profitable.

(This post, originally posted on ArtsBiz Miami’s Blog, is one in a weekly series highlighting The pARTnership Movement, Americans for the Arts’ campaign to reach business leaders with the message that partnering with the arts can build their competitive advantage. Visit our website to find out how both businesses and local arts agencies can get involved!)

Miami native Mitchell Kaplan sits surrounded by books.  In a time when the number of independent booksellers dropped from over 6,000 to just under 2,000, Kaplan has successfully built an arts and business hybrid that is Books & Books. His establishment is a success story, thanks in part to his relationships with the authors that create the books he sells and to the community.  Thirty-two years ago, Kaplan had a vision to create a place to congregate outside of work and the home.  He wanted an environment where people could meet, relax, share knowledge while celebrating the local literary and cultural community.

In 1983 he helped establish the internationally recognized Miami International Book Fair. He and several other community leaders got the call from Miami Dade College President, Eduardo Padron, to create a community-wide book event that would bring a larger audience to the Wolfson campus. From the start it celebrated writers and readers and has grown into one of the top festivals in the country, a week-long celebration of all things literary. The event includes author readings, showcase events, and children’s activities. As co-founder of the fair, Kaplan has served on the board for over 30 years and helped develop the Florida Center for the Literary Arts. Today, Books & Books hosts over 700 literary events each year in Miami. Kaplan’s team is also actively involved in bringing nearly 400 artists to the Miami International Book Fair. In addition, his stores host unique events with dozens of arts groups and artists each year.

We sat down with Mitchell Kaplan to talk about his unique experiences working as both a small business owner and supporter of our local cultural community.

ABC:What do you think makes a vibrant community and what role do the arts play?

MK:  If you do not have an active arts community, you miss out on the intellectual creativity it brings.  Miami is a great example of the impact arts can have on the community. Twenty five years ago we had very little to offer cultural consumers. The arts bring economic vitality to neighborhoods and help local merchants and businesses that profit for their patrons and participants.

ABC:  Why do you think it is important for business to support the arts?

MK:   Miami is a great city with cultural assets that bring a creative vitality to our community.  Companies should support the arts to maintain that sense of excitement; it draws more visitors to our city and enhances the quality of life for our residents.  As an independent bookstore, my customers vote with their purchases.  For me partnerships with the arts expand the reach of the store and draw in new business. We used to send out a printed newsletter and now do it by email.  Each one features exciting information on authors and features upcoming events and programs. Most of them have a strong cultural component which we cherish and relish.

ABC: What do you value in a partnership with the arts and what role do tangible benefits play?

MK: I look for partnerships that are mutually beneficial and create a platform that introduces new audiences to both partners.  I look at who their target audience is and what does the group bring to the table. Is it a good fit for our company? Our featured partners provide a benefit to their clients or customers who then become aware of Books & Books.  It is a circle, creating a win-win for all. The same with our partnerships with authors; writers are not only artists but are creators of the product that we sell. Our success benefits them and their success benefits us.

ABC:Tell us about one of your great partnerships with the arts.

MK:  There have been so many over the years it is hard to pick just one.  We have worked with theatre groups and hosted local play readings. We have had music groups that performed and educational programs for arts board members and artists. We have also had some unique collaborations with banks, temples, churches and even retail giants. We worked with Macy’s, hosting local cookbook authors to do cooking demos in their  in-store kitchens.  We have the opportunity to get creative with our authors and partners, which makes the relationship successful.

ABC:  How do you personally decide which companies to patronize?

MK:I find I support businesses that support things that I appreciate or causes that are important to me – especially small businesses that give our neighborhoods a unique feel.  When you spend $1 with a local merchant it is like spending $6 with a national retailer, which means more is invested back into the local economy and the community.

ABC:  Anything else you would like to share?

MK:  You need to develop a great team to survive, either in business or the arts.  My team of marketers, buyers, vendors and staff understand the larger mission of Books & Books and help us to thrive. Even in difficult economies or circumstances surrounding yourself and your business with creative energy is always fulfilling and profitable.

(This post, originally posted on ArtsBiz Miami’s Blog, is one in a weekly series highlighting The pARTnership Movement, Americans for the Arts’ campaign to reach business leaders with the message that partnering with the arts can build their competitive advantage. Visit our website to find out how both businesses and local arts agencies can get involved!)

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