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Samsung Put Art In the TV

Posted by Jessica Gaines
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Samsung Put Art In the TV

Samsung is a global leader in all things technology, from consumer electronics to semiconductors to information systems and more. The cutting-edge company continues to boost their brand by acutely including the arts in the scheme.

 

Last year, we shared a story about Samsung’s Summer Speaker Series and the Pipeline to the Workforce hosted at Samsung837 that brought in speakers and leaders from the creative and artistic industries. This Spring, Samsung will debut a new TV known as The Frame, a flatscreen that can camouflage itself as a piece of art when not in use.

 

Samsung collaborated with Yves Behar, a renowned Swiss designer, on this TV innovation to offer consumers an elegant masterpiece that seamlessly blends into the interior of any home. Dave Das, SVP Consumer Electronics Marketing for Samsung Electronics America says, “The Frame empowers you to think about TV in a new way, bringing art and entertainment into new parts of your home. This is how television transforms—and becomes an essential part of your lifestyle.”

 

 

The Frame’s "Art Mode" will enable users to select from more than 100 art pieces in many different categories -- from architecture, landscape, wildlife, drawing, and more -- for it to display when not in use as a conventional TV. Paired with numerous options for visual layouts and colors, as well as accessories like a stylish TV stand designed like an easel, the product is ideal for any artist-inspired living space.

 

This brand, long known for creating technology that powers the future, is innovating products that help users reimagine their home in an artful presentation, that like a gallery.

 

Take a look here at Samsung837's year of Art and Tech!

 

Photos: Samsung

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From Data Center to Design-Centered

Posted by Chris Zheng
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From Data Center to Design-Centered

The term ‘technological infrastructure’ typically brings to mind rows of cables, wires, and circuitry, arranged in a precise and deliberate order. It probably does not conjure images of creativity and imagination.

Granted, complex networks of machinery are exactly what one would find upon entering one of Google’s data centers, massive buildings which house the servers and fiber-optic cables necessary to power the world’s largest search engine. Though operations and protocol inside the buildings are rigid, Google has still found an outlet for creativity and a unique opportunity to partner with artists on the outside of its facilities through its Data Center Murals Project.

 

Vice President of Google Data Centers, Joe Kava, explains the artistic inspiration for the project: “because these buildings [data centers] typically aren’t much to look at, people usually don’t, and rarely learn about the incredible structures and people who make so much of modern life possible. To begin to change that, we created the Data Center Mural Project: a partnership with artists to bring a bit of the magic from the inside of our data centers to the outside.”

 

Through this initiative, Google supports artists who transform blank, boring data center facades into massive, multistory canvases. In Oklahoma, Google hired digital artist Jenny Odell to create a mural for the data center which serves much of the West and Midwest regions of the United States. Odell chose to create enormous, circular collages made up of imagery collected from Google Maps which emphasize modern infrastructure. In Belgium, street artist Oil-B painted his interpretation of ‘the cloud’ on the side of the data center responsible for operations in all of Western Europe. Each abstract cloud is composed of elements specific to the community, data center, and its employees.

 

While these are the only two murals at this time, Google hopes to expand the project, and is already in the process of installing murals on data centers located in Ireland and Iowa. Through its continual support of the arts, Google continues to reinvent and beautify the technology that drives modern life. 

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Times New Roman, Adapted from Olden Times

Posted by Kate Reese
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Times New Roman, Adapted from Olden Times

CEOs often credit artistic experiences in youth with inspiration for innovative ideas that later launch their career; Apple founder, Steve Jobs is no exception. After dropping out of school, Jobs got by living on couches, collecting cents for recycled plastic, and oddly enough, practicing his calligraphy. This ancient art form, which he “stumbled upon by following [his] curiosity and ambition," sparked a desire to learn more about typography and different alphabets.

 

At Reed College, while taking classes from priest Father Robert Palladino, Jobs began to investigate the historical beauty of this art form and the ways that calligraphic writing had been a part of technological innovations in the past (Johannes Gutenberg based the Gothic lettering for his printing press on the calligraphy of the Trappist monks). Palladino’s first-hand exposure to this tradition helped to shape Job’s experience with typeface, setting the stage for what would later become Apple’s distinctively appealing user interface.

 

While the connection between the calligraphy of Trappist monks and the iPhone may seem tenuous, Jobs said that if it weren’t for dropping in on these classes, the Mac, and potentially personal computers to follow, would never have featured the decorative embellishments and proportionally spaced fonts that make these devices so appealing to consumers. Steve Jobs' reputation as an innovator is underscored by the thematic connections he was able to draw between his bohemian days as a college drop-out and his tenure as CEO at Apple. While Apple’s many products have certainly increased consumer usage of digital typefaces on screens, it is worth remembering that the creative impetus for such technologies lies in a centuries-old art form, written on scrolls of paper. Read the full story.

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Programs by Design

Posted by Kate Reese
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Programs by Design

Here at the pARTnership Movement, we talk a lot about how experience in the arts fosters creativity, problem solving skills, and strategic thinking. In Philadelphia, an industrial designer-turned-executive is living this truth, as covered in a recent article on Philly.com.

 

Karin Copeland says her attention to product design fostered her aptitude for program design in her current role as Executive Director at the Arts + Business Council of Greater Philadelphia (ABC). When she first started the job, she noticed a handful of improvement areas and set to work sculpting programs the same way one might sculpt clay.

 

When she arrived at the organization, its reputation hinged largely on an annual luncheon that gathers more than 1400 each year. While the event drew crowds, Copeland saw an opportunity for expansion and “wanted ABC to be recognized as a source of valuable programs of mutual benefit to the business and arts communities.”

 

Since then, Copeland has tripled participation in existing programs such as Business on Board, which educates professionals about good nonprofit arts board behavior like fundraising. The Kennet Symphony orchestra is one example of success – it’s gained two engaged board members through participation in the program.

 

Among the new programs Copeland’s vision has brought to fruition is a speaker series that routinely sells out; notable professionals such as Malcolm Gladwell and Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg rank among past speakers.

 

ABC has also launched a program called Designing Leadership, which partners with IBM and The Wharton School of Business to provide executive development for arts, culture, and creatives sectors.

 

Through these new strategic initiatives, the Arts + Business Council of Greater Philadelphia has expanded reach and demonstrated the ultimate value arts can have for business community. At the helm, Karin Copeland is perfect example of how exposure to the arts enables entrepreneurs to envision change, take a leap and bring lofty ideas to fruition.

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Which Came First: the Designer or the Entrepreneur?

Posted by Kate Reese
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Which Came First: the Designer or the Entrepreneur?

The association between entrepreneurial thinking and creativity has long been established; marketers may brainstorm by doodling while a software engineer listens to Bach in order to work through a difficult algorithm.

 

However, as businesses are required to innovate more and more quickly with an ever-present eye on the next trend, creativity is no longer an ancillary job skill but a necessity for survival and success. In a recent Huffington Post piece, California College of Arts President Stephen Beal elaborates: “Companies […] need creative people who bring to the workplace unique problem-solving skills, a deep understanding of the user experience, and, yes, the entrepreneurial spirit.”

 

Though it is easy to assert that entrepreneurial success requires innovative thinking, it is worthwhile to consider what activities habituate this sort of creative mindfulness. Businesses across America seem to have the answer…hire artists! Silicon Valley venture investors, who are notorious for a fascination with “disruptive” behavior, have recently begun partnering with local design schools and arts programs in order to cultivate relationships with creative types before they even graduate.

 

Research universities used to be the primary source of young talent for engineering firms and bio-medical companies; now, liberal arts and creative degree programs now represent a largely-untapped pool of candidates with excellent problem-solving skills, refined grasp on user experience and propensity for innovative thinking – an entrepreneur’s dream! According to the enigmatic hotel, airline and hospitality mogul Richard Branson, “If you’re not innovating, you’re going backwards.”

 

Beal claims that art students not only have experience with project-based work, but are comfortable with uncertainty and failure. Why is that desirable in an employee? He says that “those who take no risks – who are afraid to fail⎯ reduce their chances for success.”

Artists embrace challenges to the status quo and, now more than ever, the business community embraces artists.

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Vans and Americans for the Arts are Halo Award Finalists!

Posted by Stacy Lasner
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We are excited to share that Vans and Americans for the Arts have been named a finalist for the 2016 Halo Awards for the annual Vans Custom Culture arts education competition!

 

The Cause Marketing Halo Awards are North American cause marketing's highest honor and the subject of a special section in Adweek. Winners will be announced and awarded at the annual Cause Marketing Forum Conference in Chicago on June 2, 2016.

 

Created to inspire and empower high school students to embrace their creativity through art and design and to bring attention to diminishing arts education budgets, Custom Culture is a national high school customization competition through which art classes design blank Vans shoes around specific themes. The class submissions are narrowed down to the top 50 and the top 5, and the grand prize winning submission secures $50,000 for their school's art program. Since 2012, Americans for the Arts has worked alongside Vans as Custom Culture’s official national charity partner.

 

Registration for the 2016 Custom Culture competition closes February 12, 2016. Register your school here.

 

According to Americans for the Arts' Ready to Innovate report, 85 percent of business leaders say they cannot find the creative candidates they’re looking for. By cultivating the abililty to think creatively in the workplace, arts education is a pathway to career success. Vans also believes that arts education will help future proof their “Off the Wall” brand. By inspiring and perpetuating youth culture, Vans maintains a stable customer base and will be able to find talented designers to lead the brand into the future.

 

Learn more about how art education cultivates the ability to think creatively in the workplace.

 

Read about other businesses supporting arts education.

 

Does your business run an arts education program for youth? We want to hear from you! Tell us about it on Twitter using #ArtsandBiz or by emailing partnership@artsusa.org.

 

 

Facts from the Custom Culture website.

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Telephone Repairman Finds True Calling in Shoe Design

Posted by Stacy Lasner
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Where do you find inspiration? In December, AARP posted a video interview with shoe designer Chris Donovan. After working as a telephone repairman for 25 years, Donovan quit his job to follow his dream: designing women’s shoes.

 

 

Donovan "derives his inspiration from Theology, current events and his life experiences as a technician also living and working in a fishing port," his website claims. He has even created shoes featuring sutures for seams and hip replacements for heels.

 

After retiring from the telephone business, Donovan spent two years in Italy at Polimoda Fashion Institute. "The teacher comes over and she's like 'that's awful. What are you doing?' She goes 'What were you?' and I go 'I was a technician, I was like a phone repair guy kind of guy.' And she goes, 'So you're crude. Do crude.' And it started clicking. All of a sudden my designs started changing, my ideas started changing, and all of a sudden they fell in love with my stuff," he explains.

 

Regardless of the industry, employers can encourage innovation in employees by challenging them to draw inspiration from the world around them and engage in activities that foster creativity. Many businesses, like 2015 BCA 10 honorees Corning Incorporated and GE's FirstBuild, are now implementing artists-in-residence programs to help employees think differently about their day to day work. Other businesses offer wall space for employees to doodle ideas whenever inspiration strikes. Some, like Griffin Technology, feature their own employee art gallery. Hallmark features Hallmarket, a showcase of over 100 employees’ personal artwork such as sculptures, jewelry, paintings, and textiles, all of which are created outside of the employees’ work at Hallmark.

 

Where do you find inspiration at work? Tell us on Twitter using #ArtsandBiz or email us at partnership@artsusa.org.

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Creative Kicks: Vans’ Custom Culture Competition for Teens

Posted by Stacy Lasner
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Creative Kicks: Vans’ Custom Culture Competition for Teens

If you’re passionate about the arts, why not show it on your feet? Vans’ Custom Culture Competition encourages high school art classes to lend their creative designs to four blank pairs of shoes for the chance to win $50,000 for their schools’ art program and have their shoes manufactured and sold nationwide.

 

According to the Custom Culture website, the contest was created to, “inspire and empower high school students to embrace their creativity through art and design, and to bring attention to diminishing arts education budgets.” In addition to providing $50,000 for the winning school, Vans will also donate proceeds from the sale of the shoes to Americans for the Arts and will provide $4,000 to each of the four runner-up schools.

 

In an article about Custom Culture in the Los Angeles Times, Americans for the Arts President and CEO Robert Lynch said, “Programs like Custom Culture play an important part in helping to bring more attention to the importance of the arts in high school curriculums. Together with key partners like Vans, we are working to raise awareness of the need for arts education in all of our nation’s schools; encourage high school students to embrace their creativity and the opportunities it can leverage; and inspire a new generation of innovative, forward focused youth.”

 

Photograph shows the shoe designs from 2014 Custom Culture winners Rio Rancho High School in New Mexico. Photo courtesy of Vans Custom Culture.

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Artists Dunk, Crunch, Discover and Play with Oreo

Posted by Kellyn Lopes
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Oreo’s latest ad campaign, “Play with Oreo” launched in January with the goal of encouraging play in everyday life, particularly through music, art, and self-expression. Working with The Martin Agency, Oreo sought out ten artists from around the world to share their creative expressions.

 

http://www.martinagency.com/media/collections/2.jpg

 

What resulted was an exciting series of images inspired by the adjectives given to prompt the artists: dream, dunk, roll, discover, twist, crunch, and rock, among others. The works will be shown in New York, Los Angeles, and Indianapolis throughout March.

 

Janda Lukin, Senior Director of Oreo, North America says, “As a brand, we are always looking for new ways to experiment, so we wanted to see what would happen when you put Oreo into the hands of creative visionaries who are known for pushing the boundaries in their own right.”

 

http://h.fastcompany.net/multisite_files/fastcompany/imagecache/slideshow_large/slideshow/2015/03/3043045-slide-dunk3451a0018-oreo-heads-ooh-ny-trnst-shltr-std-23625x3428.jpg    http://a.fastcompany.net/multisite_files/fastcompany/imagecache/slideshow_large/slideshow/2015/03/3043045-slide-dunk3451a0018-oreo-heads-ooh-ny-trnst-shltr-std-23625x3429.jpg

 

See more of the images here.

 

Photos, from top: “Discover” Craig + Karl; “Dunk” Alex Trochut & Freddy Arenas; “Crunch” Ryan Todd. Courtesy of Oreo and The Martin Agency.

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Coca-Cola Celebrates 100 Years by Inviting Artists to Recreate the Iconic Bottle

Posted by Kellyn Lopes
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http://assets.coca-colacompany.com/55/02/b573f95048d8a21e8f395058088c/turner-duckworth.jpgCoca-Cola has been inspiring artists and designers for 100 years. From Andy Warhol to Marc Jacobs, the iconic bottle and bold colors have served as a subject and muse for creative expression. In celebration of its long partnership with the arts, Coca-Cola has invited artists to create and share their own inspired works. More than 130 artists from 15 countries have participated, creating over 250 works through the #MashupCoke project.

 

“We wanted to celebrate our past, while simultaneously writing our future, through design,” explains James Sommerville, Coca-Cola’s vice president of global design. “The resulting posters are as unique and varied as their creators–each an expression of individuality linked together by the Coca-Cola bottle.”

 

Many of the works will be shown globally, with a select few included in the exhibit at the High Museum in Atlanta: The Coca-Cola Bottle: An American Icon at 10, as well as the traveling tour: The Coca-Cola Bottle Art Tour: Inspiring Pop Culture for 100 Years.


Sommerville notes, “We want to reinforce how current the Coca-Cola bottle still is today with both young people and people who have known the brand for many years.”

 

To learn more about #MashupCoke and view the artwork, click here, or visit @mashupcoke on Instagram.

 

Photo: #MashupCoke submission by Brian Steele, Sarah Moffat, and David Turner Duckworth, courtesy of Coca-Cola.

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