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Award-Winning Examples of Companies Supporting the Arts

Posted by Emily Peck
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Award-Winning Examples of Companies Supporting the Arts

The arts are an economic driver. According to the Arts & Economic Prosperity study, released by Americans for the Arts, the nonprofit arts and culture industry generated $166.3 billion of economic activity during 2015, which comprised $63.8 billion in spending by arts and cultural organizations and an additional $102.5 billion in audience spending. 

The arts are also a business. Americans for the Arts’ Creative Industries report shows that 673,656 businesses are involved in the creation or distribution of the arts and these businesses employ 3.48 million people. To put that in perspective, that is 4.01 percent of all U.S. businesses and 2.04 percent of all U.S. employees.

 

Businesses are taking note. In the survey Business Contributions to the Arts, produced by The Conference Board and Americans for the Arts, 67 percent of business leaders say they support the arts because they improve the economy and quality of life.

BCA 10: Best Businesses Partnering with the Arts honoree Guitar Center Inc. is one of those businesses. With 280 stores across the country, Guitar Center is the world’s largest seller of musical instruments, stage lighting, recording software, studio gear and more. The company embraces its role in both the arts and business sectors by supporting music education and musicians. Guitar Center’s support of music education makes it the largest source of music education outside the school system by providing lessons to over 100,000 students annually. Research from the Conference Board shows that a background in arts education provides the skills required by the 21st century workforce. The company also supports the artistic talents of its employees by providing discounts on gear and “Gig Leave,” so employees can go on music tours. Company sponsored “Jam Nights” at local venues give employees the opportunity to perform with coworkers for their families and friends. Guitar Center both supports the arts and employs artists.

 

The award-winning partnership between the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) and clothing retailer UNIQLO shows how partnering with the arts can provide economic impact. UNIQLO’s flagship store occupies a prominent corner on Fifth Avenue in New York City, just across the street from MoMA. Since 2013, UNIQLO and MoMA have partnered to bring more than 1.6 million New Yorkers and visitors from around the world to MoMA through UNIQLO’s sponsorship of Free Friday Nights at the museum. The partnership enhances both organizations’ brands and fuels traffic across Manhattan’s 53rd Street.

These partnerships demonstrate what the businesses in our survey know: supporting the arts enhances the community, stimulates the economy, engages employees and provides the training needed for the future workforce.

 

Originally published on Giving Thoughts blog.

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Study Demonstrates That Nonprofit Arts Are An Economic, Employment Powerhouse

Posted by Jessica Gaines
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A new national study by Americans for the Arts finds that the nation’s nonprofit arts and culture industry generated $166.3 billion in economic activity in 2015—$63.8 billion in spending by arts and cultural organizations and an additional $102.5 billion in event-related spending by their audiences. This activity supported 4.6 million jobs and generated $27.5 billion in government revenue. 

 

Arts & Economic Prosperity® 5 (AEP5) is the largest study of its kind ever conducted and was released June 17, 2017 at Americans for the Arts’ Annual Convention in San Francisco. AEP5 documents the economic contributions of the nonprofit arts industry nationally as well as in 341 study regions, representing all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Data was gathered from 14,439 arts and cultural organizations and from 212,691 members of their audiences. Project economists customized input-output models for each study region to ensure reliable and actionable localized results.

 

“By every measure, the results of Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 prove that the arts are an industry—a generator of government revenue, a cornerstone of tourism, and an employment powerhouse both locally and across the nation,” said Robert L. Lynch, president and CEO of Americans for the Arts. “Leaders who care about community and economic vitality, growing tourism, attracting an innovative workforce, and community engagement can feel good about choosing to invest in the arts.”

 

Key AEP5 Findings

·        Nationally, the nonprofit arts industry generated $166.3 billion of economic activity in 2015—$63.8 billion in spending by arts and cultural organizations and an additional $102.5 billion in event-related expenditures by their audiences.

·        This industry supported 4.6 million jobs and generated $27.5 billion in revenue to local, state, and federal governments—a yield well beyond their collective $5 billion in arts allocations.

·        Money spent by nonprofit arts and cultural organizations supported a larger share of the U.S. workforce—0.83 percent—than the legal or public safety sectors.

·        Based on the 212,691 audience surveys conducted, the typical arts attendee spent $31.47 per person, per event, beyond the cost of admission.

·        The economic impact of the arts is more than the monies spent in communities. Cultural tourists spend money, as well. Thirty-four percent of attendees traveled from outside of the county in which the event took place. Their event-related spending was more than twice that of their local counterparts ($47.57 vs. $23.44).

·        A vibrant arts community not only keeps residents and their discretionary spending closer to home, it also attracts visitors who spend money and help local businesses thrive. Sixty-nine percent of nonlocal attendees indicated that the primary purpose of their visit was “specifically to attend this arts or cultural event.”

·        Among local attendees, 41 percent said they would have traveled to a different community to attend a similar cultural event, if the arts event they wanted to attend was not taking place. 

 

“With current threats against nonprofit organizations, such as limiting the federal charitable tax deduction, the $27.5 billion in revenue back to the government generated by arts industry expenditures shows that municipal, state and federal arts support is not a one-way street. Rather, there is a benefit of substantial revenue back to government that accompanies the public good that these organizations and their audiences provide to their community,” said Lynch. 

 

The full report, a map of the 341 study regions and a two-page economic impact summary for each, a sample PowerPoint presentation, and a media toolkit for advocates can be found at www.AmericansForTheArts.org/EconomicImpact. A blog discussing these findings in detail is available on Americans for the Arts’ website.

 

Thirteen national organizations partnered with Americans for the Arts on AEP5, including The United States Conference of Mayors, National Lieutenant Governors Association, Committee Encouraging Corporate Philanthropy, National Association of Counties, National League of Cities, Destinations International, National Alliance of Community Economic Development Associations, International City/County Management Association, Independent Sector, Grantmakers in the Arts, National Conference of State Legislatures, Council on Foundations, and The Conference Board. 

 

Americans for the Arts’ work on AEP5 has been supported by The Ruth Lilly Fund of Americans for the Arts, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and Barr Foundation. In addition, Americans for the Arts’ local and statewide study partners contributed both time and a cost-sharing fee to support to the study. Financial information from organizations was collected in partnership with DataArts™, using an online survey interface.

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Samsung’s Summer Speaker Series and the Pipeline to the Workforce

Posted by Melyssa Muro
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While it is no secret that internship experiences are invaluable to college students or anyone joining the workforce, Samsung recently curated an event for students in NYC to be in conversation with some of the city’s industry leaders. From late July to the end of August, students gathered once a week at Samsung 837 for this Mini-Internship to hear the life stories and lessons from top names in media, music, film, sports, and more. In addition to Samsung executives, featured speakers included Academy Award-winning director Ang Lee and Iron Chef David Burke. The series also included representatives from prominent local organizations, such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Natural History. Students were further exposed to these industry pioneers through an open forum, where they participated with questions and free discussion with the star-studded guest list.

 

The program is ongoing with the support of Meatpacking Business Improvement District, and is part of Samsung’s continued commitment to advancing students—particularly amid the summer months. Andrew Bowins, vice president of Samsung Electronics America’s Corporate Reputation, has expressed interest in creating a pipeline for the future, stating that for young professionals, “Access to role models who could become mentors can be a critical step into the workforce.” Samsung has further shown its dedication to education and professional development through their Hope for Children initiative (ongoing for over a decade), as well as partnerships between the Corporate Citizenship team and many educational programs focused on helping students hone skills necessary to join the workforce.

 

In this way, Samsung truly upholds the standard of how a company should contribute to the economy and in doing so, improve the quality of life not just for the immediate community, but for generations to come.

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Actor Tim Daly speaks on the value of the arts and the Creative Coalition

Posted by Patrick O'Herron
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Emmy-award-winning actor Tim Daly, a Creative Coalition board member, believes that art is a part of everything we do. According to him, this means that we need creative thinkers to take business, innovation and invention to a new level. Why? Because creativity allows business to "leap over the competition."

 

Watch Tim's informative interview below, part of the Noble Profit video series, in which he details just how the arts and creativity impact the economy, using examples from Tesla Motors and IDEO.

 

 

Creative Coalition board member
Creative Coalition board member
Creative Coalition board memberCreative Coalition board member
Emmy-award-winning
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