News

Arts and business news from around the country.

RSS

Making the Arts in Rural Oregon Their Business

Posted by Kathleen Chaves
0 Comments

In 2002, jobs were scarce in rural, isolated Baker City, OR, population 10,000. My husband and I decided to dedicate ourselves to growing our 20-year-old company, Chaves Consulting, Inc. from providing two jobs to creating 100 with a complete package of benefits.

At about the same time, another vision was being created by the Crossroads Arts board to have someone raise the almost two million dollars it would take to renovate Baker City’s historic 1909 Carnegie Library building to become their new home after spending much of its history without a permanent one. The Crossroads board asked if I would be the grant writer to raise the funding and manage the renovation project.

My husband, Richard, and my motivation for leading the project was based on the vision of how the arts could grow and make a huge difference in the lives of Baker’s children and families, as it had altered mine. I strongly believed that this project would provide children an avenue to express themselves and uplift them as it had done for me during my teenage years when I felt very disconnected and lost.

We believed that the arts could give children a voice who otherwise felt lonely and isolated. The arts saved my life and made me feel a part of something. I believed it could do the same in Baker. In addition, the renovated Carnegie building would give hundreds of adult Eastern Oregon artists an incredible space to share their gift.

In 2008, six years and $1.8 million later, Chaves Consulting and the Crossroads Arts board had realized their vision of creating a fully restored historic gem to be Crossroads Art Center’s permanent home. Crossroads Carnegie Art Center is a community art center that provides sales gallery, pottery studio, dance studio, classrooms, and a theater space in which people of all ages can show their art and receive ongoing art education.

Crossroads also hosts community events, lectures, programs, and traveling art shows. It is available for businesses to conduct retreats and meetings, and for weddings, graduation receptions…anything the community could envision.

Chaves Consulting, Inc.’s 30 employees continue to support Crossroads with sponsorships, donations, and the most valuable commodity—our time. Chaves creates and supports an employee environment that encourages participation in the arts. My husband and I do simple things like purchasing artist Terri Axness’ cards that depict Baker City’s beauty to send as business thank you notes.

Mary Tomlinson, our marketing director, and I lead a mentoring team for Crossroads Executive Director Ginger Savage. Chaves team members have folded newsletters, made displays for fundraising efforts, fixed the executive director’s broken computer (numerous times), and generally are there for Crossroads for projects large or small.

My husband, Richard, is currently advising Ginger on the selection of new membership software for the organization.

Ginger appreciates the help, saying, “For me as a nonprofit director, to be able to ask questions or get help at no charge from a business like Chaves is amazing! I get professional advice and it takes their amazing staff, in most cases, minutes to answer my questions. Chaves makes it a priority to help the arts!”

Chaves Consulting, Inc. received a 2012 BCA10 Award from the Americans for the Arts for leadership in the Carnegie restoration project and their long-term support of Crossroads and the arts in rural, geographically remote, high-poverty Eastern Oregon.

When thanking Americans for the Arts for the award, Richard said, “If every company did their part in their communities to support children and the arts, it would become the norm instead of the exception.”

This year Crossroads hosted “Persistence in Clay: Contemporary Ceramics in Montana” a national traveling exhibition of ceramics from the Missoula Art Museum. It was the organization’s first national traveling exhibition and they were able to leverage over $60,000 in grant funds to promote the show and make permanent improvements to the center.

In 2013, Crossroads Carnegie Art Center celebrates its 50th Anniversary as the oldest continuously operating community arts center in the state of Oregon.

Crossroads envisions celebrating by starting an artist relocation program and continuing to attract artists and traveling shows that will enrich the lives of children and adults in Eastern Oregon.
 

*This article was originally posted on ARTSblog.

In 2002, jobs were scarce in rural, isolated Baker City, OR, population 10,000. My husband and I decided to dedicate ourselves to growing our 20-year-old company, Chaves Consulting, Inc. from providing two jobs to creating 100 with a complete package of benefits.

At about the same time, another vision was being created by the Crossroads Arts board to have someone raise the almost two million dollars it would take to renovate Baker City’s historic 1909 Carnegie Library building to become their new home after spending much of its history without a permanent one. The Crossroads board asked if I would be the grant writer to raise the funding and manage the renovation project.

My husband, Richard, and my motivation for leading the project was based on the vision of how the arts could grow and make a huge difference in the lives of Baker’s children and families, as it had altered mine. I strongly believed that this project would provide children an avenue to express themselves and uplift them as it had done for me during my teenage years when I felt very disconnected and lost.

We believed that the arts could give children a voice who otherwise felt lonely and isolated. The arts saved my life and made me feel a part of something. I believed it could do the same in Baker. In addition, the renovated Carnegie building would give hundreds of adult Eastern Oregon artists an incredible space to share their gift.

In 2008, six years and $1.8 million later, Chaves Consulting and the Crossroads Arts board had realized their vision of creating a fully restored historic gem to be Crossroads Art Center’s permanent home. Crossroads Carnegie Art Center is a community art center that provides sales gallery, pottery studio, dance studio, classrooms, and a theater space in which people of all ages can show their art and receive ongoing art education.

Crossroads also hosts community events, lectures, programs, and traveling art shows. It is available for businesses to conduct retreats and meetings, and for weddings, graduation receptions…anything the community could envision.

Chaves Consulting, Inc.’s 30 employees continue to support Crossroads with sponsorships, donations, and the most valuable commodity—our time. Chaves creates and supports an employee environment that encourages participation in the arts. My husband and I do simple things like purchasing artist Terri Axness’ cards that depict Baker City’s beauty to send as business thank you notes.

Mary Tomlinson, our marketing director, and I lead a mentoring team for Crossroads Executive Director Ginger Savage. Chaves team members have folded newsletters, made displays for fundraising efforts, fixed the executive director’s broken computer (numerous times), and generally are there for Crossroads for projects large or small.

My husband, Richard, is currently advising Ginger on the selection of new membership software for the organization.

Ginger appreciates the help, saying, “For me as a nonprofit director, to be able to ask questions or get help at no charge from a business like Chaves is amazing! I get professional advice and it takes their amazing staff, in most cases, minutes to answer my questions. Chaves makes it a priority to help the arts!”

Chaves Consulting, Inc. received a 2012 BCA10 Award from the Americans for the Arts for leadership in the Carnegie restoration project and their long-term support of Crossroads and the arts in rural, geographically remote, high-poverty Eastern Oregon.

When thanking Americans for the Arts for the award, Richard said, “If every company did their part in their communities to support children and the arts, it would become the norm instead of the exception.”

This year Crossroads hosted “Persistence in Clay: Contemporary Ceramics in Montana” a national traveling exhibition of ceramics from the Missoula Art Museum. It was the organization’s first national traveling exhibition and they were able to leverage over $60,000 in grant funds to promote the show and make permanent improvements to the center.

In 2013, Crossroads Carnegie Art Center celebrates its 50th Anniversary as the oldest continuously operating community arts center in the state of Oregon.

Crossroads envisions celebrating by starting an artist relocation program and continuing to attract artists and traveling shows that will enrich the lives of children and adults in Eastern Oregon.

- See more at: http://blog.artsusa.org/2013/02/28/making-the-arts-in-rural-oregon-their-business-from-the-partnership-movement/#more-18984

In 2002, jobs were scarce in rural, isolated Baker City, OR, population 10,000. My husband and I decided to dedicate ourselves to growing our 20-year-old company, Chaves Consulting, Inc. from providing two jobs to creating 100 with a complete package of benefits.

At about the same time, another vision was being created by the Crossroads Arts board to have someone raise the almost two million dollars it would take to renovate Baker City’s historic 1909 Carnegie Library building to become their new home after spending much of its history without a permanent one. The Crossroads board asked if I would be the grant writer to raise the funding and manage the renovation project.

My husband, Richard, and my motivation for leading the project was based on the vision of how the arts could grow and make a huge difference in the lives of Baker’s children and families, as it had altered mine. I strongly believed that this project would provide children an avenue to express themselves and uplift them as it had done for me during my teenage years when I felt very disconnected and lost.

We believed that the arts could give children a voice who otherwise felt lonely and isolated. The arts saved my life and made me feel a part of something. I believed it could do the same in Baker. In addition, the renovated Carnegie building would give hundreds of adult Eastern Oregon artists an incredible space to share their gift.

In 2008, six years and $1.8 million later, Chaves Consulting and the Crossroads Arts board had realized their vision of creating a fully restored historic gem to be Crossroads Art Center’s permanent home. Crossroads Carnegie Art Center is a community art center that provides sales gallery, pottery studio, dance studio, classrooms, and a theater space in which people of all ages can show their art and receive ongoing art education.

Crossroads also hosts community events, lectures, programs, and traveling art shows. It is available for businesses to conduct retreats and meetings, and for weddings, graduation receptions…anything the community could envision.

Chaves Consulting, Inc.’s 30 employees continue to support Crossroads with sponsorships, donations, and the most valuable commodity—our time. Chaves creates and supports an employee environment that encourages participation in the arts. My husband and I do simple things like purchasing artist Terri Axness’ cards that depict Baker City’s beauty to send as business thank you notes.

Mary Tomlinson, our marketing director, and I lead a mentoring team for Crossroads Executive Director Ginger Savage. Chaves team members have folded newsletters, made displays for fundraising efforts, fixed the executive director’s broken computer (numerous times), and generally are there for Crossroads for projects large or small.

My husband, Richard, is currently advising Ginger on the selection of new membership software for the organization.

Ginger appreciates the help, saying, “For me as a nonprofit director, to be able to ask questions or get help at no charge from a business like Chaves is amazing! I get professional advice and it takes their amazing staff, in most cases, minutes to answer my questions. Chaves makes it a priority to help the arts!”

Chaves Consulting, Inc. received a 2012 BCA10 Award from the Americans for the Arts for leadership in the Carnegie restoration project and their long-term support of Crossroads and the arts in rural, geographically remote, high-poverty Eastern Oregon.

When thanking Americans for the Arts for the award, Richard said, “If every company did their part in their communities to support children and the arts, it would become the norm instead of the exception.”

This year Crossroads hosted “Persistence in Clay: Contemporary Ceramics in Montana” a national traveling exhibition of ceramics from the Missoula Art Museum. It was the organization’s first national traveling exhibition and they were able to leverage over $60,000 in grant funds to promote the show and make permanent improvements to the center.

In 2013, Crossroads Carnegie Art Center celebrates its 50th Anniversary as the oldest continuously operating community arts center in the state of Oregon.

Crossroads envisions celebrating by starting an artist relocation program and continuing to attract artists and traveling shows that will enrich the lives of children and adults in Eastern Oregon.

- See more at: http://blog.artsusa.org/2013/02/28/making-the-arts-in-rural-oregon-their-business-from-the-partnership-movement/#more-18984

In 2002, jobs were scarce in rural, isolated Baker City, OR, population 10,000. My husband and I decided to dedicate ourselves to growing our 20-year-old company, Chaves Consulting, Inc. from providing two jobs to creating 100 with a complete package of benefits.

At about the same time, another vision was being created by the Crossroads Arts board to have someone raise the almost two million dollars it would take to renovate Baker City’s historic 1909 Carnegie Library building to become their new home after spending much of its history without a permanent one. The Crossroads board asked if I would be the grant writer to raise the funding and manage the renovation project.

My husband, Richard, and my motivation for leading the project was based on the vision of how the arts could grow and make a huge difference in the lives of Baker’s children and families, as it had altered mine. I strongly believed that this project would provide children an avenue to express themselves and uplift them as it had done for me during my teenage years when I felt very disconnected and lost.

We believed that the arts could give children a voice who otherwise felt lonely and isolated. The arts saved my life and made me feel a part of something. I believed it could do the same in Baker. In addition, the renovated Carnegie building would give hundreds of adult Eastern Oregon artists an incredible space to share their gift.

In 2008, six years and $1.8 million later, Chaves Consulting and the Crossroads Arts board had realized their vision of creating a fully restored historic gem to be Crossroads Art Center’s permanent home. Crossroads Carnegie Art Center is a community art center that provides sales gallery, pottery studio, dance studio, classrooms, and a theater space in which people of all ages can show their art and receive ongoing art education.

Crossroads also hosts community events, lectures, programs, and traveling art shows. It is available for businesses to conduct retreats and meetings, and for weddings, graduation receptions…anything the community could envision.

Chaves Consulting, Inc.’s 30 employees continue to support Crossroads with sponsorships, donations, and the most valuable commodity—our time. Chaves creates and supports an employee environment that encourages participation in the arts. My husband and I do simple things like purchasing artist Terri Axness’ cards that depict Baker City’s beauty to send as business thank you notes.

Mary Tomlinson, our marketing director, and I lead a mentoring team for Crossroads Executive Director Ginger Savage. Chaves team members have folded newsletters, made displays for fundraising efforts, fixed the executive director’s broken computer (numerous times), and generally are there for Crossroads for projects large or small.

My husband, Richard, is currently advising Ginger on the selection of new membership software for the organization.

Ginger appreciates the help, saying, “For me as a nonprofit director, to be able to ask questions or get help at no charge from a business like Chaves is amazing! I get professional advice and it takes their amazing staff, in most cases, minutes to answer my questions. Chaves makes it a priority to help the arts!”

Chaves Consulting, Inc. received a 2012 BCA10 Award from the Americans for the Arts for leadership in the Carnegie restoration project and their long-term support of Crossroads and the arts in rural, geographically remote, high-poverty Eastern Oregon.

When thanking Americans for the Arts for the award, Richard said, “If every company did their part in their communities to support children and the arts, it would become the norm instead of the exception.”

This year Crossroads hosted “Persistence in Clay: Contemporary Ceramics in Montana” a national traveling exhibition of ceramics from the Missoula Art Museum. It was the organization’s first national traveling exhibition and they were able to leverage over $60,000 in grant funds to promote the show and make permanent improvements to the center.

In 2013, Crossroads Carnegie Art Center celebrates its 50th Anniversary as the oldest continuously operating community arts center in the state of Oregon.

Crossroads envisions celebrating by starting an artist relocation program and continuing to attract artists and traveling shows that will enrich the lives of children and adults in Eastern Oregon.

- See more at: http://blog.artsusa.org/2013/02/28/making-the-arts-in-rural-oregon-their-business-from-the-partnership-movement/#more-18984

In 2002, jobs were scarce in rural, isolated Baker City, OR, population 10,000. My husband and I decided to dedicate ourselves to growing our 20-year-old company, Chaves Consulting, Inc. from providing two jobs to creating 100 with a complete package of benefits.

At about the same time, another vision was being created by the Crossroads Arts board to have someone raise the almost two million dollars it would take to renovate Baker City’s historic 1909 Carnegie Library building to become their new home after spending much of its history without a permanent one. The Crossroads board asked if I would be the grant writer to raise the funding and manage the renovation project.

My husband, Richard, and my motivation for leading the project was based on the vision of how the arts could grow and make a huge difference in the lives of Baker’s children and families, as it had altered mine. I strongly believed that this project would provide children an avenue to express themselves and uplift them as it had done for me during my teenage years when I felt very disconnected and lost.

We believed that the arts could give children a voice who otherwise felt lonely and isolated. The arts saved my life and made me feel a part of something. I believed it could do the same in Baker. In addition, the renovated Carnegie building would give hundreds of adult Eastern Oregon artists an incredible space to share their gift.

In 2008, six years and $1.8 million later, Chaves Consulting and the Crossroads Arts board had realized their vision of creating a fully restored historic gem to be Crossroads Art Center’s permanent home. Crossroads Carnegie Art Center is a community art center that provides sales gallery, pottery studio, dance studio, classrooms, and a theater space in which people of all ages can show their art and receive ongoing art education.

Crossroads also hosts community events, lectures, programs, and traveling art shows. It is available for businesses to conduct retreats and meetings, and for weddings, graduation receptions…anything the community could envision.

Chaves Consulting, Inc.’s 30 employees continue to support Crossroads with sponsorships, donations, and the most valuable commodity—our time. Chaves creates and supports an employee environment that encourages participation in the arts. My husband and I do simple things like purchasing artist Terri Axness’ cards that depict Baker City’s beauty to send as business thank you notes.

Mary Tomlinson, our marketing director, and I lead a mentoring team for Crossroads Executive Director Ginger Savage. Chaves team members have folded newsletters, made displays for fundraising efforts, fixed the executive director’s broken computer (numerous times), and generally are there for Crossroads for projects large or small.

My husband, Richard, is currently advising Ginger on the selection of new membership software for the organization.

Ginger appreciates the help, saying, “For me as a nonprofit director, to be able to ask questions or get help at no charge from a business like Chaves is amazing! I get professional advice and it takes their amazing staff, in most cases, minutes to answer my questions. Chaves makes it a priority to help the arts!”

Chaves Consulting, Inc. received a 2012 BCA10 Award from the Americans for the Arts for leadership in the Carnegie restoration project and their long-term support of Crossroads and the arts in rural, geographically remote, high-poverty Eastern Oregon.

When thanking Americans for the Arts for the award, Richard said, “If every company did their part in their communities to support children and the arts, it would become the norm instead of the exception.”

This year Crossroads hosted “Persistence in Clay: Contemporary Ceramics in Montana” a national traveling exhibition of ceramics from the Missoula Art Museum. It was the organization’s first national traveling exhibition and they were able to leverage over $60,000 in grant funds to promote the show and make permanent improvements to the center.

In 2013, Crossroads Carnegie Art Center celebrates its 50th Anniversary as the oldest continuously operating community arts center in the state of Oregon.

Crossroads envisions celebrating by starting an artist relocation program and continuing to attract artists and traveling shows that will enrich the lives of children and adults in Eastern Oregon.

- See more at: http://blog.artsusa.org/2013/02/28/making-the-arts-in-rural-oregon-their-business-from-the-partnership-movement/#more-18984

In 2002, jobs were scarce in rural, isolated Baker City, OR, population 10,000. My husband and I decided to dedicate ourselves to growing our 20-year-old company, Chaves Consulting, Inc. from providing two jobs to creating 100 with a complete package of benefits.

At about the same time, another vision was being created by the Crossroads Arts board to have someone raise the almost two million dollars it would take to renovate Baker City’s historic 1909 Carnegie Library building to become their new home after spending much of its history without a permanent one. The Crossroads board asked if I would be the grant writer to raise the funding and manage the renovation project.

My husband, Richard, and my motivation for leading the project was based on the vision of how the arts could grow and make a huge difference in the lives of Baker’s children and families, as it had altered mine. I strongly believed that this project would provide children an avenue to express themselves and uplift them as it had done for me during my teenage years when I felt very disconnected and lost.

We believed that the arts could give children a voice who otherwise felt lonely and isolated. The arts saved my life and made me feel a part of something. I believed it could do the same in Baker. In addition, the renovated Carnegie building would give hundreds of adult Eastern Oregon artists an incredible space to share their gift.

In 2008, six years and $1.8 million later, Chaves Consulting and the Crossroads Arts board had realized their vision of creating a fully restored historic gem to be Crossroads Art Center’s permanent home. Crossroads Carnegie Art Center is a community art center that provides sales gallery, pottery studio, dance studio, classrooms, and a theater space in which people of all ages can show their art and receive ongoing art education.

Crossroads also hosts community events, lectures, programs, and traveling art shows. It is available for businesses to conduct retreats and meetings, and for weddings, graduation receptions…anything the community could envision.

Chaves Consulting, Inc.’s 30 employees continue to support Crossroads with sponsorships, donations, and the most valuable commodity—our time. Chaves creates and supports an employee environment that encourages participation in the arts. My husband and I do simple things like purchasing artist Terri Axness’ cards that depict Baker City’s beauty to send as business thank you notes.

Mary Tomlinson, our marketing director, and I lead a mentoring team for Crossroads Executive Director Ginger Savage. Chaves team members have folded newsletters, made displays for fundraising efforts, fixed the executive director’s broken computer (numerous times), and generally are there for Crossroads for projects large or small.

My husband, Richard, is currently advising Ginger on the selection of new membership software for the organization.

Ginger appreciates the help, saying, “For me as a nonprofit director, to be able to ask questions or get help at no charge from a business like Chaves is amazing! I get professional advice and it takes their amazing staff, in most cases, minutes to answer my questions. Chaves makes it a priority to help the arts!”

Chaves Consulting, Inc. received a 2012 BCA10 Award from the Americans for the Arts for leadership in the Carnegie restoration project and their long-term support of Crossroads and the arts in rural, geographically remote, high-poverty Eastern Oregon.

When thanking Americans for the Arts for the award, Richard said, “If every company did their part in their communities to support children and the arts, it would become the norm instead of the exception.”

This year Crossroads hosted “Persistence in Clay: Contemporary Ceramics in Montana” a national traveling exhibition of ceramics from the Missoula Art Museum. It was the organization’s first national traveling exhibition and they were able to leverage over $60,000 in grant funds to promote the show and make permanent improvements to the center.

In 2013, Crossroads Carnegie Art Center celebrates its 50th Anniversary as the oldest continuously operating community arts center in the state of Oregon.

Crossroads envisions celebrating by starting an artist relocation program and continuing to attract artists and traveling shows that will enrich the lives of children and adults in Eastern Oregon.

- See more at: http://blog.artsusa.org/2013/02/28/making-the-arts-in-rural-oregon-their-business-from-the-partnership-movement/#more-18984

In 2002, jobs were scarce in rural, isolated Baker City, OR, population 10,000. My husband and I decided to dedicate ourselves to growing our 20-year-old company, Chaves Consulting, Inc. from providing two jobs to creating 100 with a complete package of benefits.

At about the same time, another vision was being created by the Crossroads Arts board to have someone raise the almost two million dollars it would take to renovate Baker City’s historic 1909 Carnegie Library building to become their new home after spending much of its history without a permanent one. The Crossroads board asked if I would be the grant writer to raise the funding and manage the renovation project.

My husband, Richard, and my motivation for leading the project was based on the vision of how the arts could grow and make a huge difference in the lives of Baker’s children and families, as it had altered mine. I strongly believed that this project would provide children an avenue to express themselves and uplift them as it had done for me during my teenage years when I felt very disconnected and lost.

We believed that the arts could give children a voice who otherwise felt lonely and isolated. The arts saved my life and made me feel a part of something. I believed it could do the same in Baker. In addition, the renovated Carnegie building would give hundreds of adult Eastern Oregon artists an incredible space to share their gift.

In 2008, six years and $1.8 million later, Chaves Consulting and the Crossroads Arts board had realized their vision of creating a fully restored historic gem to be Crossroads Art Center’s permanent home. Crossroads Carnegie Art Center is a community art center that provides sales gallery, pottery studio, dance studio, classrooms, and a theater space in which people of all ages can show their art and receive ongoing art education.

Crossroads also hosts community events, lectures, programs, and traveling art shows. It is available for businesses to conduct retreats and meetings, and for weddings, graduation receptions…anything the community could envision.

Chaves Consulting, Inc.’s 30 employees continue to support Crossroads with sponsorships, donations, and the most valuable commodity—our time. Chaves creates and supports an employee environment that encourages participation in the arts. My husband and I do simple things like purchasing artist Terri Axness’ cards that depict Baker City’s beauty to send as business thank you notes.

Mary Tomlinson, our marketing director, and I lead a mentoring team for Crossroads Executive Director Ginger Savage. Chaves team members have folded newsletters, made displays for fundraising efforts, fixed the executive director’s broken computer (numerous times), and generally are there for Crossroads for projects large or small.

My husband, Richard, is currently advising Ginger on the selection of new membership software for the organization.

Ginger appreciates the help, saying, “For me as a nonprofit director, to be able to ask questions or get help at no charge from a business like Chaves is amazing! I get professional advice and it takes their amazing staff, in most cases, minutes to answer my questions. Chaves makes it a priority to help the arts!”

Chaves Consulting, Inc. received a 2012 BCA10 Award from the Americans for the Arts for leadership in the Carnegie restoration project and their long-term support of Crossroads and the arts in rural, geographically remote, high-poverty Eastern Oregon.

When thanking Americans for the Arts for the award, Richard said, “If every company did their part in their communities to support children and the arts, it would become the norm instead of the exception.”

This year Crossroads hosted “Persistence in Clay: Contemporary Ceramics in Montana” a national traveling exhibition of ceramics from the Missoula Art Museum. It was the organization’s first national traveling exhibition and they were able to leverage over $60,000 in grant funds to promote the show and make permanent improvements to the center.

In 2013, Crossroads Carnegie Art Center celebrates its 50th Anniversary as the oldest continuously operating community arts center in the state of Oregon.

Crossroads envisions celebrating by starting an artist relocation program and continuing to attract artists and traveling shows that will enrich the lives of children and adults in Eastern Oregon.

- See more at: http://blog.artsusa.org/2013/02/28/making-the-arts-in-rural-oregon-their-business-from-the-partnership-movement/#more-18984

In 2002, jobs were scarce in rural, isolated Baker City, OR, population 10,000. My husband and I decided to dedicate ourselves to growing our 20-year-old company, Chaves Consulting, Inc. from providing two jobs to creating 100 with a complete package of benefits.

At about the same time, another vision was being created by the Crossroads Arts board to have someone raise the almost two million dollars it would take to renovate Baker City’s historic 1909 Carnegie Library building to become their new home after spending much of its history without a permanent one. The Crossroads board asked if I would be the grant writer to raise the funding and manage the renovation project.

My husband, Richard, and my motivation for leading the project was based on the vision of how the arts could grow and make a huge difference in the lives of Baker’s children and families, as it had altered mine. I strongly believed that this project would provide children an avenue to express themselves and uplift them as it had done for me during my teenage years when I felt very disconnected and lost.

We believed that the arts could give children a voice who otherwise felt lonely and isolated. The arts saved my life and made me feel a part of something. I believed it could do the same in Baker. In addition, the renovated Carnegie building would give hundreds of adult Eastern Oregon artists an incredible space to share their gift.

In 2008, six years and $1.8 million later, Chaves Consulting and the Crossroads Arts board had realized their vision of creating a fully restored historic gem to be Crossroads Art Center’s permanent home. Crossroads Carnegie Art Center is a community art center that provides sales gallery, pottery studio, dance studio, classrooms, and a theater space in which people of all ages can show their art and receive ongoing art education.

Crossroads also hosts community events, lectures, programs, and traveling art shows. It is available for businesses to conduct retreats and meetings, and for weddings, graduation receptions…anything the community could envision.

Chaves Consulting, Inc.’s 30 employees continue to support Crossroads with sponsorships, donations, and the most valuable commodity—our time. Chaves creates and supports an employee environment that encourages participation in the arts. My husband and I do simple things like purchasing artist Terri Axness’ cards that depict Baker City’s beauty to send as business thank you notes.

Mary Tomlinson, our marketing director, and I lead a mentoring team for Crossroads Executive Director Ginger Savage. Chaves team members have folded newsletters, made displays for fundraising efforts, fixed the executive director’s broken computer (numerous times), and generally are there for Crossroads for projects large or small.

My husband, Richard, is currently advising Ginger on the selection of new membership software for the organization.

Ginger appreciates the help, saying, “For me as a nonprofit director, to be able to ask questions or get help at no charge from a business like Chaves is amazing! I get professional advice and it takes their amazing staff, in most cases, minutes to answer my questions. Chaves makes it a priority to help the arts!”

Chaves Consulting, Inc. received a 2012 BCA10 Award from the Americans for the Arts for leadership in the Carnegie restoration project and their long-term support of Crossroads and the arts in rural, geographically remote, high-poverty Eastern Oregon.

When thanking Americans for the Arts for the award, Richard said, “If every company did their part in their communities to support children and the arts, it would become the norm instead of the exception.”

This year Crossroads hosted “Persistence in Clay: Contemporary Ceramics in Montana” a national traveling exhibition of ceramics from the Missoula Art Museum. It was the organization’s first national traveling exhibition and they were able to leverage over $60,000 in grant funds to promote the show and make permanent improvements to the center.

In 2013, Crossroads Carnegie Art Center celebrates its 50th Anniversary as the oldest continuously operating community arts center in the state of Oregon.

Crossroads envisions celebrating by starting an artist relocation program and continuing to attract artists and traveling shows that will enrich the lives of children and adults in Eastern Oregon.

- See more at: http://blog.artsusa.org/2013/02/28/making-the-arts-in-rural-oregon-their-business-from-the-partnership-movement/#more-18984
Related

Bold Partnerships for Dallas Arts Orgs

Posted by Michael Granberry
0 Comments
Bold Partnerships for Dallas Arts Orgs

Dallas-based AT&T is putting its business acumen to work for five financially challenged arts organizations. The corporation will provide free oversight to the Dallas Symphony Orchestra, Dallas Opera, AT&T Performing Arts Center, Dallas Theater Center, and Dallas Summer Musicals.

 

The goal of the partnership is to stanch the financial bleeding that has plagued the organizations since the 2008 recession.

 

“The old economic business models are not working,” DSO chairman Blaine Nelson said. “Revenues are falling far short of costs and expenses.”

 

Financial woes have besieged the DSO, Dallas Opera, and Dallas Summer Musicals, which recently asked the city for money.

 

The partnership is designed to help the companies streamline operations and share numerous endeavors, while preserving their independence. It’s also aimed at quelling the fierce competition that has existed at times between the performing arts center and Dallas Summer Musicals, both of which present Broadway shows.

 

Nelson says that “donor heroics” are no longer a winning strategy. Donors are, he said, increasingly younger givers who have tired of “a bottomless pit” and the absence of a “sustainable business model.” They prefer to be seen, he said, as investors, not donors.

Nelson helped conceive the new model, called the Performing Arts Collaboration, which was first broached six months ago.

 

“The donor community and the corporate community are a bit fatigued,” said AT&T executive Ron Spears. “Their message back has been very clear: We want to support you, but we need to see some level of rationalization about the way we operate in the Arts District. We would like to see it become much more businesslike than what we’ve seen in the past, which is, every time someone gets into trouble, they come knocking at the door in a financial rescue effort.”

 

Under the agreement, the five will retain what the group calls “institutional and artistic identity,” with AT&T providing “leadership, offering resources and brainpower.” In making the announcement, the institutions promised to explore “combining back-office operations such as health care and benefits, ticketing and box office, scheduling and capacity, artistic collaboration and facility management.”

 

As for how much each organization would save, that’s a mystery for now.

“We don’t know,” said Chris Heinbaugh, spokesman for the AT&T Performing Arts Center. “Part of the process is drilling down into all the details and figuring out what the real savings might be.”

 

All five companies perform in facilities owned by the city, though the city will not share in managing the new arrangement. “As both a businessman and an arts supporter, the initiative makes all the sense in the world,” Mayor Mike Rawlings said.

 

Since the opening of the Winspear Opera House, competition has often been an issue with the Arts District newcomer and its Fair Park rival, Dallas Summer Musicals.

 

Roger Nanney, board president of the AT&T PAC, and Michael Jenkins, president and managing director of DSM, “have sat down,” Spears said. “They agree that competition for artistic work doesn’t make any sense.” So one of the first big efforts between the two, Spears said, will be “how to better coordinate.” Staging Broadway shows in Dallas should now become “a better overall experience. What’s been going on is not the best.”

 

AT&T is gifted, Nelson said, at finding “more efficient ways to operate, at reducing costs and redundancies.” He cited as one example the five groups having five separate box offices. “I see no reason,” he says, “why we can’t share one box office.”

 

“Where do I think this journey will lead us?” Nelson said. “I don’t know. But the goal for all of these organizations, which mean so much to the city of Dallas economically and culturally, is to find better ways to operate. We simply have to.”

 

*This post was originally published by The Dallas News and ARTSblog.

In Pro Bono We Trust

Posted by Tim McClimon
0 Comments

The week before Hurricane Sandy turned the East Coast upside down, American Express and other companies joined the Taproot Foundation in celebrating Pro Bono Week.

 

We participated by hosting a Scope-a-thon, an effort to engage our employees in helping to scope projects from nonprofits in order to prepare them to more fully benefit from pro bono consulting in the future.

 

We had 35 American Express employees in our New York office assist 11 nonprofits in a three-hour marathon Scope-a-thon. The nonprofits included:

  • Brooklyn Public Library
  • City Parks Foundation
  • Creative Alternatives of New York
  • GallopNYC
  • God’s Love We Deliver
  • Historic House Trust
  • Japan Society
  • Neighborhood Housing Services of NYC
  • New York Blood Center
  • Reel Works Teen Filmmaking
  • Studio Museum in Harlem

 

The Taproot Foundation did a terrific job of structuring the conversation around these four questions:

        1. First, what hurts?
        2. Next, what are some ways to fix it?
        3. So, what’s the specific prescription?
        4. And finally, what’s the treatment plan?

 

The response from both employees and nonprofits was extremely positive. 100 percent of employees said that they would participate again and refer the program to a colleague. One employee went so far as to say that it was her “best day” at American Express.

Nonprofit leaders were equally pleased, with one stating: “Yesterday’s session was a terrific opportunity to gain fresh insights and perspectives from your esteemed colleagues.”

 

The occasion of Pro Bono Week also provided me with an incentive to sit down and read Aaron Hurst’s new book on leadership.

 

In addition to Aaron’s role as president and founder of Taproot, he writes a blog for the Huffington Post. Last year, he interviewed 19 corporate leaders (including me) about their careers and interests, and the evolving relationship between business and the community.

 

In his introduction to the book (he also did the line drawings), Aaron summarizes his discussions with corporate leaders with this statement:

  • At the heart of their visions is an awareness that coinciding and driving much of the change in the social contract between business and society is a change in the social contract between professionals and society. Professionals and the talents they bring in areas like marketing, technology, management, design and finance are the currency of the service economy and are playing a core role in the evolution of corporate philanthropy and community investment.

 

Here are a few other quotes about pro bono work from corporate leaders featured in Aaron’s book:

  • “A little over five years ago, we identified our people and their talent as our greatest strengths. Being a company that has a lot of employees, we said we have to leverage this group beyond just their time. While time is valuable, we think that talent is a multiplier. Now, 100 percent of our youth-serving grants have what’s called “link and leverage,” which is they’re linking to a company asset beyond cash. We also leverage internal talent pro bono to get our work done as a foundation. From strategic planning to surveys to website design, employees from different areas of the company volunteer to help us meet our goals.” ~ Bobby Silten, The Gap
  • “Our Corporate Service Corps is one of our key programs. We take our top talent in the company and give them the ability to deliver strategic planning assistance, project management assistance, technology strategies, and social networking tools. In the last 3.5 years, over a thousand employees have worked in teams with not-for-profit organizations and governments, creating really lasting partnerships. I like to think that we’re operating in the community arena the same way we operate in the business environment.” ~ Stan Litow, IBM
  • “We’ve always done pro bono work and we clearly see the value internally. We use it as a development area for our people. It’s really embedded in our value system. To us, it’s accelerating the development of our employees and making better professionals. They need to understand the global markets; they need to understand the broader communities in which we operate.” ~ Kathy Hopkinkah-Hannan, KPMG

 

At American Express, our pro bono consulting program, which we call Serve2Gether Consulting, is completing its first full year of operation.

 

Like Kathy Hopkinkah-Hannan, we’re pleased with the results internally, and like Stan LItow and Bobby Silten, we clearly see the potential for leverage externally. Next year, we hope to grow the program globally by partnering with a select number of nonprofit organizations who can help us “outsource” the mechanics of the program.

 

Stay tuned for more results next year.

 

*Originally posted on Tim’s CSR Now! blog and also on ARTSblog.

*Photo via.

Related

Getting Past the "Now" Culture Within Arts Organizations

Posted by Elizabeth Schwan-Rosenwald
0 Comments
Getting Past the "Now" Culture Within Arts Organizations

Yesterday I met with a number of potential applicants for the Taproot Foundation’s Service Grant program, which connects business professionals with nonprofits to deliver pro bono consulting projects in marketing, strategy, and human resources. I was there to continue my research into some of the more universal pain points in building strong infrastructures for performing arts organizations.

 

As we sat there I heard an executive director mention that “in six years we’ve never sat down and planned for or talked about the future.” They were, he explained; too busy focusing on developing and producing art.

 

I hesitated for a moment trying to decide the right response and the conversation turned away from his comment. But it stayed with me—I’ve heard this before.

The “now” culture within arts organizations, the focus on getting up the next show, the ever present feeling that if you’re not producing you’re somehow failing, means that conversations about how to strategically plan for the future are often an organization’s last priority.

 

But I hesitated yesterday because I’m not convinced; I’ve seen and worked with too many artists who are driven rather than stymied by how their vision fits into the larger national landscape. So what is it then—what is the roadblock that keeps arts organization from talking about the future?

 

My answer—resources; the scarcity of resources for arts organizations means most artists have adopted a head-down approach to their work.

 

Because let’s face it, if there’s any group of people who could dream a better future for their organizations it’s the artists in our communities. But conversations about the future are a risk right now because none of us know what the future looks like.

 

But if arts organizations understood how to better tap into the resources of the business community and professionals working in the business community knew how to offer pro bono consulting to local arts organizations would the dialogue change?

 

When arts organizations know they can count on the business community to support their strategic planning, marketing collateral, or financial planning would we hear more conversations about growth plans? I think so.

 

Pro bono consulting—doing work for a nonprofit for free that draws on the skills a business professional uses every day—is a relatively new pool of resources. And it won’t take from limited philanthropic dollars but rather allow arts organizations to build a new stream of resources.

 

Since 2001, Taproot has worked with over 3,000 business professionals engaging them in pro bono service in our core markets in Chicago, New York, the District of Columbia, San Francisco, and Los Angeles.

 

Our newest program Powered by Pro Bono, launching in the fall of 2012, takes our ten years of experience of engaging business professionals and delivering high-quality programs and offers the necessary tools and trainings to allow nonprofits to successfully solicit and manage pro bono resources independently.

 

Through pro bono consulting, business professionals have the opportunity to become more involved citizens and actively engage in new ways in their community.

 

We’re anticipating that by starting the conversation about how to make pro bono a core part of any nonprofit’s organizational growth we will see a shift in how the conversation is conducted.

 

Pro bono and the business professionals who deliver it will be counted on as resources to build a strong infrastructure under those dreams and conversations about what the future looks like.

 

Talking about the future then will be a celebrated part of an art’s organization’s journey.

For more information about Taproot and our programming visit our website at www.taprootfoundation.org.

 

*Photo courtesy of bixentro.

Related

Already a partner?

Already a partner?

Learn easy ways to take your partnership to a new level.

Use our ads locally

Use our ads locally

View The pARTnership Movement ad campaign and find ways to use the ads.

pARTnership videos

pARTnership videos

Watch and share our videos from The pARTnership Movement.

Partnership ideas

Partnership ideas

Inspire employees with tickets to the ballet or a concert.

Are you an arts group?

Are you an arts group?

Get listed in our searchable directory.

Recruit talent

Recruit talent

Employees want to live and work in a vibrant community.