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Times New Roman, Adapted from Olden Times

Posted by Kate Reese
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Times New Roman, Adapted from Olden Times

CEOs often credit artistic experiences in youth with inspiration for innovative ideas that later launch their career; Apple founder, Steve Jobs is no exception. After dropping out of school, Jobs got by living on couches, collecting cents for recycled plastic, and oddly enough, practicing his calligraphy. This ancient art form, which he “stumbled upon by following [his] curiosity and ambition," sparked a desire to learn more about typography and different alphabets.

 

At Reed College, while taking classes from priest Father Robert Palladino, Jobs began to investigate the historical beauty of this art form and the ways that calligraphic writing had been a part of technological innovations in the past (Johannes Gutenberg based the Gothic lettering for his printing press on the calligraphy of the Trappist monks). Palladino’s first-hand exposure to this tradition helped to shape Job’s experience with typeface, setting the stage for what would later become Apple’s distinctively appealing user interface.

 

While the connection between the calligraphy of Trappist monks and the iPhone may seem tenuous, Jobs said that if it weren’t for dropping in on these classes, the Mac, and potentially personal computers to follow, would never have featured the decorative embellishments and proportionally spaced fonts that make these devices so appealing to consumers. Steve Jobs' reputation as an innovator is underscored by the thematic connections he was able to draw between his bohemian days as a college drop-out and his tenure as CEO at Apple. While Apple’s many products have certainly increased consumer usage of digital typefaces on screens, it is worth remembering that the creative impetus for such technologies lies in a centuries-old art form, written on scrolls of paper. Read the full story.

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BuzzFeed’s 14 Ways Doing Theater As A Kid Can Help You As An Adult

Posted by Stacy Lasner
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BuzzFeed’s 14 Ways Doing Theater As A Kid Can Help You As An Adult

Numerous business leaders have attributed their success in business to their arts education background. You can find many of their stories on pARTnershipMovement.org.


Excerpted from BuzzFeed’s February 23, 2016 article by Maritsa Patrinos, here are 14 ways doing theater as a kid can help you as an adult. You can learn more about how theater helps cultivate these skills by reading the full article on BuzzFeed.


Interested in learning how to use the arts to cultivate these skills in your employees? Learn about arts-based training examples here.


14 Ways Doing Theater As A Kid Can Help You As An Adult
1. It improves your public speaking skills.
2. You learn the value of teamwork.
3. It teaches you empathy.
4. You become a master of stress management.
5. You’ll gain confidence.
6. But you’ll also learn some humility.
7. It teaches you how to deal with rejection.
8. You’ll know how to work on a deadline.
9. It is a surefire way of gaining reading skills.
10. You’ll gain a higher appreciation of the written (and spoken) word.
11. It makes you more charismatic.
12. Your memorization skills will be on point.
13. It gets you in the habit of staying physically active.
14. It teaches you some real-world professionalism.
 

Photo courtesy of Trust Company of Kansas. Photo by Christopher Clark.

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