News

Arts and business news from around the country.

RSS

Celebrating Culture Through Art

Posted by Jessica Gaines
0 Comments
Related

Coca-Cola’s Refreshing Style

Posted by Jessica Gaines
0 Comments

 

 

We all know the Coca-Cola Company for its many beverage products, catchy commercial jingles, and unmatched red and white logo. It’s no surprise that a company with such global staying power and industry prominence would look to elements and influences of art.

 

Here are just a few ways Coca-Cola keeps their business refreshing and top-of-mind:

 

The #TrayArtProject

Together with 12 artists from around the world, Delta and Coca-Cola have created an art gallery in the sky – transforming the tray tables on one of the airline’s 767 aircraft into one-of-a-kind works of art.

 

Each artist brought their own personal style and taste to their trays and drew inspiration from some of the airline’s most popular destinations, including: Amsterdam, Atlanta, London, Los Angeles, Mexico City, New York City, Paris, Sao Paulo, Seattle, Seoul, Shanghai and Tokyo. Each piece of art celebrates themes of optimism, travel, refreshment and happiness. 

 

 

Post-Pop Artist Burton Morris brings the iconic bottle to life

In his ongoing search for objects with cultural significance, Burton Morris saw Coca-Cola as a natural subject. A lifelong fan of both the Coca-Cola beverage and brand, he was always enamored by its visual identity. “I loved the bottle design… the red and the white, and the shape itself,” he explains. “It just has such a classic feeling… the bottle and topography themselves are art. As an artist, when I look at it, dozens of ideas run through my mind.”

 

In 2015, to honor the 100th anniversary of the Coca-Cola bottle, Morris channeled those ideas onto his art by creating 100 unique renderings of the iconic package for display in a gallery show and a traveling exhibition that went around the world.

 

 

In-House Art Curator

Caitlin, the company’s Brand and Fine Art Manager has a pretty cool job. She manages their corporate fine art collection and determines what pieces are placed on their walls. “So here at The Coca-Cola Company we want our associates to know that you are in a unique place. And you’re in a place that really values your presence every day. We want to express that through art installation.”

 

Photo: Coca-Cola

Related

Arts and Tech in Philadelphia

Posted by Jessica Gaines
0 Comments
Arts and Tech in Philadelphia

2017 Philly Tech Week (PTW), a week-long celebration of technology and innovation happening throughout the Philadelphia Region, presented by Comcast and organized by Technical.ly, kicks off on April 28. Organized into seven tracks (Creative, Access, Dev, Civic, Business, Media and Sciences), some tracks have conference sessions to delve deeper into the content areas. The Creative Track “where art and technology collide,” encompasses projects ranging from video games, digital art, community initiatives, and more.

 

In an effort to involve more artists and creatives in the Creative Track and the overall event, PTW has launched a microgrant competition for artists to apply for funds to develop a creative display to showcase at the PTW Signature Closing Event. A few immersive, interactive or innovative creations will be selected and more information about the microgrant opportunity can be found here.

 

2016 PTW grants went to mission-minded community groups.

 

Photo: Aidan Un

Related

More Inspired with LIFEWTR

Posted by Jessica Gaines
0 Comments
Related

Elevate the Work and the Walls

Posted by Jessica Gaines
0 Comments

 

 

When a company wants to say thanks and show appreciation to its employees, many companies consider office art competitions, corporate art collections, or staff-curated “The Best of Instagram” galleries for their break room. (Like 2016 BCA 10 winner Dealer.com’s employee Instagram wall above.)

 

Another way for a company to show that it cares and put creativity at the forefront of the work environment is by including art and creativity in the office design. Sounds easy! Let’s dive into some imaginative and inspired office looks:

 

 

Boldness and Distinction

Making a statement that sets a 

tone for the rest of the office

and work experience.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo: Courtesy Katz Interiors

 

 

Flexibility - Create areas that serve dual purposes (meeting areas or lounges) and by using less desks, can transition to spaces for future employees, contractors, interns, and more. Also, standing desks are begging to make your employees better thinkers!

 

 

Photo: Jasper Sandid

 

 

Greenery - Sometimes office creativity isn’t about crazy carpets and bright paint. Adding plant life as décor or even a living garden wall can amp up the employee engagement opportunities.

 

 

 

Photo: Franciso Nogueira

 

Sometimes office enhancements are as simple as unique and better lighting or hiring local artists to paint colorful murals. Anyone of these fresh looks are great ways to get employees and leadership in touch beyond the work. Employing artistic elements to establish an exceptional corporate culture and identity is a great way to elevate the work and the walls.

 

Top Photo: 2016 BCA 10 winner Dealer.com’s employee Instagram wall

Related

Investing in Curiosity and Exploration

Posted by Jessica Gaines
0 Comments
Investing in Curiosity and Exploration

What makes one business outshine others in its field? A few things come to mind but committing to community often pushes a company ahead of its competitors.

 

Digital agency, Situation Interactive, is an example of this type of commitment. As a creative-driven agency that uses media and technology to tell immersive brand stories, Situation Interactive has been fortunate to be named one of the Best Companies to Work for in New York by the New York State Society for Human Resource Management (NYS-SHRM) in 2016. It’s not so much about luck however, Situation Interactive’s Founder Damian Bazadona attributes this type of recognition as a direct reflection of their clients and team. Their ability to gain this honor is further highlighted by the company’s beneficial and necessary commitment and investment in the community.

 

Every year, Situation rewards praiseworthy NYC public school students with a Broadway show experience. The program began with one middle school, MS 343 in the South Bronx, that is located in the poorest congressional district in the nation yet, one of the highest performing schools in New York City. Using funds slated for holiday gift baskets for clients and partners, Situation sent the entire school to see Spider-Man: Turn off the Dark – significant as most of these students had never been on a field trip, much less seen a Broadway show.

 

School trips to world-class arts and culture with access to working arts professionals: The Situation Project was born.

 

Now in its sixth year, the Situation Project predominantly provides Broadway-level experiences, see #TheatreMakesMe, but also boasts other art and culture experiences for these NYC middle school students including experiences like a tour of the Metropolitan Museum of Art for an 8th grade photography class before it had opened to the public.

 

With the Situation Project, Situation Interactive shows how they are on a mission to stimulate and expand the imaginations of students in their local communities.

 

Photo: Situation Project

Related

Two Institutions’ Approach to Reawakening Inventiveness

Posted by Jessica Gaines
0 Comments
Two Institutions’ Approach to Reawakening Inventiveness

NUvention: Arts

A course offered by Northwestern University’s Farley Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation at the McCormick School of Engineering in partnership with the School of Communications MS in Leadership for Creative Enterprises program.

 

NUvention: Arts uses lectures, case studies and guest speakers to give students a first-hand look at what it takes to start a creative arts company in an age of digital disruption. Culminates in a team project that asks students to create and pitch an arts-minded business idea.

 

With digital technology changing the interaction with and consumption of the arts, and with entrepreneurship on the rise, this course is giving students the ability to develop successful businesses in which an artistic component is the helm.

 

Theatre student, Elizabeth Hunter, who used the course to re-work her approach to her educational video game on Shakespeare’s Macbeth titled, Something Wicked, says “It was super valuable for me to be in an environment where the goal is not deconstruction, but construction.” Hunter worked alongside MBA and other masters-level students in the course, being tasked with creating, rather than critiquing.

 

Ahren Alexander knew early on in his Northwestern career that he was interested in entrepreneurship.  The engineering major also had a keen interest in music. “We Skyped in with Beyonce’s manager, the CEO of Pandora, the lead singer of Train. It was awesome,” Alexander said. “There was also an opportunity to chat with entrepreneurs in the area, around Chicago. It was just phenomenal. That’s something I think is extremely important with entrepreneurship – being able to make those kinds of relationships.”

 

 

Innovation Institute

An artist-led professional development program at the contemporary art center and urban artist residency program McColl Center for Art + Innovation.

 

The Innovation Institute has a professional facilitator with a background in organizational coaching and creative development join an artist to lead participants, business leaders, in exercises around unlocking creativity, encouraging risk-taking, and stimulating imaginative thinking. The sessions begin with the artist talking about his or her work and creative process. The artists then lead the participants through a series of experiences where they are making, sharing, presenting, critiquing and discussing art.

 

This pushes participants outside their comfort zone. “By having them participate in the creative process, they gain a visceral understanding of the fact that for every piece of art they see on the wall of a gallery, there are probably 40 other pieces that were failures that nobody will ever see,” says artist and program instructor Susan Harbage Page.

 

Fabi Preslar, president at SPARK Publications, a design firm specializing in custom-published books, magazines, and catalogs, attended the Innovation Institute. In the months before she attended, she had been feeling burnt out. “Just to hear how these artists find inspiration in their everyday experiences helped reawaken my creativity,” says Preslar. With her new perspective, she was able to make

the bold decisions needed to reinvigorate her business. Her company’s revenue jumped 118 percent in the year after her graduation and then rose another 19 percent the following year.

 

Bob Hambright, Division President at Centex Construction, sent his executive team to the institute. One of the Centex executives ended up coming back with an idea for a bold new HR model for how the company should hire, retain, and develop its people. “To me, the Innovation Institute ended up being a good way to stretch people’s minds. I think that spending time with right-brained artists and participating in these art activities helped them appreciate people with different skills from their own. Their time at the Institute helped them appreciate the importance of creativity in finding the best business solutions.”

 

More about the institute in the pARTnership Movement essay on fostering critical thinking.

 

 

Related

Valuable and Unique Essays on Business and Arts pARTnerships

Posted by Jessica Gaines
0 Comments

 

 

All across the country, today’s most innovative businesses are using the arts to help them meet some of their most difficult and vital objectives. Americans for the Arts is proud to announce the complete pARTnership Movement essay series. These eight essays, with case studies that profile successful business-arts relationships, illustrate one of the 8 reasons businesses partner with the arts and are available here on The pARTnership Movement website. Click on a thumbnail above to download each essay.

 

Recruit and Retain Talent

Make your community – and your company – more attractive to current and future employees by partnering with arts organizations to create a vibrant cultural scene.

 

Put Your Company in the Spotlight

Build your market share, enhance your brand, and reach new customers by partnering with the arts to put your business in the spotlight.

 

Advance Corporate Objectives & Strategies

Use the arts to communicate important messages to customers, employees, and other stakeholders.

 

Foster Critical Thinking

Help employees stimulate the critical thinking needed to advance business goals by partnering with the arts.

 

Engage Your Employees

Use arts partnerships to inspire and engage employees so that they are able to achieve their full potential.

 

Embrace Diversity & Team Building

Facilitate the creation of a strong corporate culture that fosters creativity while providing opportunities for employees to strengthen interdepartmental relationships, exchange ideas and broaden their networks.

 

Say Thanks

Inspire your employees by providing access to arts experiences that show your appreciation for their contributions.

 

Contribute to the Economy & Quality of Life

The arts create jobs, spur urban renewal, attract new businesses, generate tourism revenue, and foster an environment that appeals to a skilled and educated workforce. By partnering with arts organizations, you can strengthen the health and vitality of our neighborhoods, cities, states, and nation.

 

 

For more information or to share your arts and business partnerships with Americans for the Arts pARTnership Movement, contact BCA Coordinator Jessica Gaines at  bca@artsusa.org.  

Related

Creative America – the $704 Billion Arts and Culture Economy

Posted by Jessica Gaines
0 Comments

Taken from the Huffington Post article “Goals Worth Fighting For,” by Americans for the Arts CEO Robert L. Lynch, below are eight goals that could strengthen our country through the arts. Great reminders to the business community and leaders everywhere as the status of federal funding for the arts is called into question.

 

1. Every person in the United States deserves to have access to the broad range of arts in his or her life. The way to do that is increase federal funding for the arts to $1 per capita for a more creative America;

 

2. Every child in the United States deserves to have access to every art form, grades K-12. The way to do that is fully fund and implement the Well-Rounded Education provisions of the Every Student Succeeds Act to close gaps in access to arts education for all students;

 

3. Our country needs to be competitive and the arts provide a great opportunity for economic development, including tourism and support for small arts businesses run by entrepreneurs. One way to get there is by establishing a cabinet-level position to advise President Trump on the $704 billion arts and culture economy;

 

4. The creation of millions of jobs would be helped by boosting economic and community development programs, like those proposed in Senator Tom Udall’s CREATE Act, which promote the role of the arts in serving the American public through federal agencies such as the Small Business Administration, Rural Development Administration, FEMA disaster recovery centers—to name just a few. The job numbers speak loudly: the nation’s arts and culture sector employed 4.7 million wage and salary workers in 2013, with a total compensation of $339 billion;

 

5. Our military service members and veterans deserve to be fully supported during and after valiantly serving our country. Two ways to do that are to support the arts as they are integrated into health and wellness programs, which has shown much success in the past, and to increase access to arts therapists and artist-directed programs to help provide a pathway for re-entry and re-integration of our service members and veterans into the workforce. The NEA’s Creative Forces program is a shining example of this work;

 

6. Preserve or expand charitable tax deduction incentives;

 

7. Support creative youth development by strengthening community-based organizations working in youth development and the arts; and

 

8. Promote cultural exchange programs that advance diplomatic objectives and cultural cooperation through the exchange of art and other aspects of culture among nations.

 

As business leaders continue to share why they value the arts, the arts' impact to and improvement of society remains notably strong.  Additional resources and information about supporting and advocating for the arts are here.

 

Photo: Courtesy of Milliken & Company 2014 BCA 10 Award winnerFountain by Krisel. Sculpture located at the Roger Milliken Center.

Sheila Pree Bright’s Young American series from The Amistad Center for Art & Culture. A program made possible by 2011 BCA 10 and 2016 BCA Hall of Fame Award winner Aetna Inc.

Courtesy of Corning Incorporated 2015 BCA 10 Award winner. Dancers at 171 Cedar Arts Center, a multi-arts center supported by Corning Incorporated Foundation.

 

Related

Influenced by the Arts

Posted by Jessica Gaines
0 Comments

These businesses and business leaders make space for the arts.

 

 

iPic Entertainment, manager of movie theaters, restaurants, bars, and bowling alleys that exist to make a difference in people’s lives by delivering innovative hospitality and memorable experiences, has infused visual art (installations and gallery-style hangings) into the customer experience. Watch the iPic Life video above featuring Li-Hill about how he develops his work that is currently featured at the iPic Fulton Market New York location. More on iPic Life artists can be found here.

 

Video: iPic Theaters

 

New Beginnings Barber Shop has combined fine art with the art of barbering. This barber shop is also a gallery where an impressive collection of African-American art, as well as new installations by local and national artists can be found. Hear from owner Troy Staton and see more photos from this unique shop in Baltimore here.

 

Photo: Andre Chung for NBC News

 

Steve Conine, CEO of online home furnishings store Wayfair, spends his downtime ice sculpting. Though his daily corporate role primarily involves software, he does acknowledge the valuable result of his creative activity, “It helps me prioritize and take calculated risks. When I’m carving slippery ice, my ability to manage risk is critical."

 

Photo: Fast Company

 

Related

More News

"Contribute to the Economy & Quality of Life" is eighth essay in series illustrating benefits of arts and business partnerships
Jan 19, 2017 0 Comments
Americans for the Arts is proud to announce the final installment in The pARTnership Movement essay series: Contribute to the Economy & Quality of Life. The newest essay features case studies from Arts Brookfield and the Houston...
Go to full post
It’s About Your People
Jan 19, 2017 0 Comments
According to MetLife's 14th Annual U.S. Employee Benefit Trends Study, 74% of employers understand the value of non-medical options while only 47% of employees do.   That’s pretty surprising considering employees desire to...
Go to full post
Using Business to Build the Leadership Pipeline in the Arts
Jan 13, 2017 0 Comments
In the story “Packaging Your Impact: How Con Edison Engages Its Employees through the ABC/NY Diversity in the Arts Leadership Program” we learned a lot about mutually beneficial arts-based partnerships.   We learned that the...
Go to full post
Research and Theatre: A Life’s Devotion
Jan 11, 2017 0 Comments
When Merrill Shugoll was selling candy at the Kennedy Center in her youth, would she have thought that she would become a research leader for arts organizations? As President of Shugoll Research in Bethesda, MD, Merrill and her...
Go to full post

Already a partner?

Already a partner?

Learn easy ways to take your partnership to a new level.

Use our ads locally

Use our ads locally

View The pARTnership Movement ad campaign and find ways to use the ads.

pARTnership videos

pARTnership videos

Watch and share our videos from The pARTnership Movement.

Partnership ideas

Partnership ideas

Inspire employees with tickets to the ballet or a concert.

Are you an arts group?

Are you an arts group?

Get listed in our searchable directory.

Recruit talent

Recruit talent

Employees want to live and work in a vibrant community.